Posts categorized as Māori

John Yaldwyn and the frog crab

  • Frog crab, Notosceles pepeke, named by John Yaldwyn and Elliot Dawson, 2000. The holotype was collected in 1998, between Three Kings Islands and Cape Reinga. Found at depths of 59–211 metres. Image by Richard Webber, Te Papa
  • Dr John Yaldwyn, Assistant Director of the National Museum, 1976. Photograph by Trevor Ulyatt. Te Papa (MA_E.00350/32a)
  • South Island stout-legged wren, Pachyplichas yaldwyni, 2005, by Paul Martinson, watercolour on paper. From the series ‘Extinct Birds of New Zealand’. Te Papa (2006-0010-1/2)
  • South Island stout-legged wren, Pachyplichas yaldwyni, 2005, by Paul Martinson, watercolour on paper. From the series ‘Extinct Birds of New Zealand’. Te Papa (2006-0010-1/2)
May 2006
Equipment: Cruse CS 185SL450 Synchron Light Scanner
Software Used: Adobe Photoshop CS 8.0

This file is property of Te Papa Press

Former museum director John Yaldwyn specialised in crustaceans, but he also had a keen interest in extinct New Zealand birds, archaeology, and history. Te Papa turned 150 years old on 8 December 2015. To celebrate 150 years since the opening of the Colonial Museum in Wellington, the exhibition ‘You called me WHAT?!’ is open on… Read more »

One motif, thirty years of exploration: Jim Geddes on Gordon Walters

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Te Papa’s touring exhibition, Gordon Walters: Koru, is currently being hosted at the Eastern Southland Gallery, Gore (23 April to 6 June), a splendid venue which is affectionately known as the ‘Goreggenheim’! Mark Stocker, Curator Historical International Art, talked to the ebullient District Curator at Eastern Southland, Jim Geddes, about it… MS: Jim, why did you… Read more »

Kōrero pūrākau o Matariki: Matariki teaching resource 2016, Part 3 – Storytelling through sand art

Students posing with their sand art. Photograph by Norm Heke. Te Papa

Suitable for: Early childhood, primary, and keen storytellers of any age This is the third and final instalment of our Matariki resource for 2016. In Parts 1 and 2, we introduced the Matariki tradition of kōrero pūrākau (storytelling), and showed how to use creative movement or dance as a meaningful and accessible storytelling medium. In… Read more »

Kōrero pūrākau o Matariki: Matariki teaching resource 2016, Part 2 – Storytelling through dance

Kids get creative with dance at Te Papa. Photograph by Kate Whitley. Te Papa

Suitable for: Early childhood, primary, and keen storytellers of any age This is the second instalment of our Matariki resource for 2016. Part 1: Storytelling In Part 1, we explored storytelling as a Māori tradition full of drama, imagery and action. In Part 2, you’ll learn how to bring creative movement and dance into your classroom,… Read more »

Kōrero pūrākau o Matariki: Matariki teaching resource 2016, Part 1 – A tradition of storytelling

Kōrero pūrākau (storytelling) in Te Huka ā Tai Discovery Centre. Photograph by Kate Whitley. Te Papa

Suitable for: Early childhood, primary, and keen storytellers of any age This is the first instalment of our Matariki resource for 2016. Celebrate Matariki, the Māori New Year, by learning about te whare tapere (the traditional Māori house of entertainment) and the role of kōrero pūrākau (storytelling). Plus, pick up some activity ideas for use… Read more »

Indigenous art curatorial practice; ideas and observations

  • Peter Robinson, Retorts and comebacks
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I am blogging a paper, as below, written in response to an invitation to talk about Indigenious art curatorial practice for the recent Pacific Art Association XII International Symposium. The symposium was held in Auckland during the week of 14 – 17 March 2016 and in a number of venues across the city including Orakei Marae,… Read more »

When do crops lose genetic variation? The case of rengarenga.

The delicate flowers of rengarenga with their multicoloured stamens.

The shift from hunting and gathering to cultivating crops and livestock was one of the most important developments in human history. But despite its significance, many questions still remain about how crops were first domesticated. One much debated question has been at what point during domestication is genetic diversity lost? Many modern crops have very… Read more »

Margaret Butler: An Invisible Sculptor?

Butler-portrait

I recently delivered a paper on the New Zealand sculptor Margaret Butler (1883-1947) at the University of Otago conference, ‘Making Women Visible’. Although one or two of her sculptures are occasionally exhibited, she is next to invisible to the wide public, certainly far more obscure than her older contemporary Frances Hodgkins. Yet whenever I see… Read more »

Wineera family portrait : A picture tells a thousand words.

  • Wi Mekerei Rawiri
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A PICTURE TELLS A THOUSAND WORDS Stories from He iti whetū : Ngāti Toa portraits. Ngā Toi Arts Te Papa: Kanohi Kitea Māori & Pacific Encounters   This family portrait from the turn of last century is a remarkable and striking statement about family and identity. Titled Ko mātou me ā mātou tamariki, mokopuna hoki, or ‘Ourselves, our children and grandchildren’, this collection… Read more »

Archives – Te Wāhi Pounamu, Areta Wilkinson and Mark Adams

Mark Adams, Land of Memories - The Ngai Tahu Monument, 4 June 1988

Earlier this month, I was invited by the Dunedin Public Art Gallery to travel to Dunedin to talk about Archives – Te Wāhi Pounamu, Areta Wilkinson and Mark Adams currently on at the gallery.  A large exhibition, the show is made up of examples of Areta Wilkinson and Mark Adams individual practices’ across time. It features bodies of work gathered, as the… Read more »