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    The southern right stuff: Photographing Wellington’s whale

    When a southern right whale captured the imagination of Wellington last week with a bout of acrobatics in Te Whanganui-a-Tara (Wellington Harbour), Imaging Specialist Jean-Claude Stahl was there with his camera to capture some pretty epic moments. Here, he shares them and sheds some light on our new best friend.

  • Black and white photograph of a street scene with people and horses

    What remains: When photos capture fleeting nature of time

    Collections Data Technician Gareth Watkins finds a series of photographs from the 1800s where a combination of movement and long exposure has created unusual, ghostly scenes.

  • Mark with a kahu huruhuru (feather cloak)

    Māori kākahu (cloaks): When is a korowai not a korowai?

    Kaitiaki Māori Collection Manager Mark Sykes explains the differences between kahu huruhuru, kahu kiwi, kahu kuri, and korowai.

A whale tail is seen out of water with hills in the background

When a southern right whale captured the imagination of Wellington last week with a bout of acrobatics in Te Whanganui-a-Tara (Wellington Harbour), Imaging Specialist Jean-Claude Stahl was there with his camera to capture some pretty epic moments. Here, he shares them and sheds some light on our new best friend.Read more

Stone Japanese human-like figure

Science Researcher Rodrigo Salvador spends most of his working hours studying snails, but his interest spans much further afield. Here, he discusses one of his favourite ‘weird’ objects in our history collection – a goggle-eyed figurine from pre-historic Japan.Read more

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The typeface used in the exhibition ‘Ko Rongowhakaata: The Story of Light and Shadow’ was developed in 2017. But its origins date back to the early 1800s, and is intimately connected to the iwi. Here is its story.Read more