Broad-billed prion chick, Snares Island. Te Papa

Would you scramble into a ‘horrible hole’ to count bird chicks? How about counting the regurgitated remains of a meal? It’s all in a day’s work for Alan Tennyson, a Te Papa scientist studying broad-billed prions (pararā). Can you mimic a bird as well as Alan can mimic a prion?Read more

Alan Tennyson and Colin Miskelly taking a blood sample from a fulmar prion. Toru Islet with main Snares Islands in background. 28 Nov 2013 Photographer Antony Kusabs ©Te Papa

The most abundant bird on the Snares Islands is the sooty shearwater (also known as the muttonbird or tītī). Four Te Papa scientists had the daunting task of counting over a million sooty shearwaters on the islands to determine the trends in their population. Watch the video to see howRead more

Snares crested penguins on the landing rocks in Station Cove. Image: Colin Miskelly: Te Papa

The wild and remote Snares Islands, 105km south-southwest of Stewart Island, are usually home only to a vast array of birds and sea life. In late 2013 the islands saw the arrival of four lucky Te Papa scientists to carry out a range of seabird and plant research projects. WatchRead more

Peek into wild landscapes. Hear Dame Suzie Moncrieff talk about the secrets behind the creative spectacle that is a World of WearableArt™ show. See Matariki performances from the stars of tomorrow. Te Papa’s Channel, launched this week, brings you into the heart of Te Papa’s multimedia collection. Now you canRead more

Buller’s mollymawk landing (Snares Islands). Te Papa

At 2.00pm today, Tuesday 18th March, Te Papa scientists will be talking about their recent trip to the Snares Islands, and the wonderful wildlife they encountered.   Watch Science Live: Expedition Snares Island via YouTube – and don’t forget to ask your questions! We’ve already had some great questions fromRead more

Recently some of our scientists carried out fieldwork on the Snares Islands,100 kilometres south of Stewart Island. They’ll be talking about their work live on Science Live: Expedition Snares Island, 18th March, 2.00pm. But why do Te Papa scientists care about the Snares Islands? What’s so special about them thatRead more

Lepidium limenophylax, Snares Island. Photographer: Antony Kusabs © Te Papa

Today is World Wildlife Day, a chance for us to celebrate diverse and wonderful wildlife all over the world. And here in New Zealand we have a lot of unique wildlife to celebrate. We asked Te Papa staff to nominate their favourite species so that you can join in ourRead more

Alan Tennyson and Colin Miskelly taking a blood sample from a fulmar prion. Toru Islet with main Snares Islands in background. 28 Nov 2013 Photographer Antony Kusabs ©Te Papa

100 kilometres south of Stewart Island, a small group of rocky islands jut abruptly from the surface of the ocean. These islands, wreathed in sea spray and surrounded by large cliffs, are known as the Snares Islands, and for a fortnight were home to four Te Papa scientists. The SnaresRead more

Happy New Year to you all! How was your summer birding? The NZ Birds Online team have been out and about enjoying the flora and fauna of New Zealand. Colin was lucky enough to get to Snares Island to see some of the subterranean avian inhabitants. We’re continuing our Meet the photographers series – as ever,Read more

Adult white-bellied sea eagle in flight, Kakadu National Park, Northern Territory, Australia, April 2007. Photographer: Sonja Ross © Sonja Ross, courtesy NZ Birds Online.

Packed full of stunning pictures, detailed information and beautiful bird calls, NZ Birds Online is an online encyclopaedia of birds created in collaboration between Te Papa, DOC and OSNZ. We’re indebted to the photographers who’ve shared their images with us – and now the world! Sonja Ross is the next intrepid birder in our Meet the photographers series.Read more

What will you find at the beach this summer? Join Te Papa scientists online at 1.30pm today, as they show you some of the amazing animals and plants you can find on your beach holidays. We’ll be talking about glow-in-the-dark invertebrates, how to tell the difference between coastal birds, andRead more

Sometimes, nature throws up something that’s weirder than you can possibly imagine. Take a look at these pictures – do you know what they are? Clue: They’re both young versions of the same animal. Any ideas? Our Curator of Invertebrates, Rick Webber, will reveal all during Science Live: Coastal CreaturesRead more