Posts tagged with Toi Te Papa

PICTURE FRAMES: figuring the edge of art.

  • Margaret Carpenter’s Portrait of Mrs W Collins, 1826. Frame original. © Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
  • Colin McCahon’s A letter to Hebrews, 1979, in Toi Te Papa exhibition. © Courtesy of the Colin McCahon Research and Publication Trust
  • Colin McCahon’s A letter to Hebrews, 1979, in Toi Te Papa exhibition. © Courtesy of the Colin McCahon Research and Publication Trust
  • Colin McCahon’s A letter to Hebrews, 1979, in Toi Te Papa exhibition. © Courtesy of the Colin McCahon Research and Publication Trust

Staging the show I rest my eye for a moment on the frame, taking a break from the work of looking hard at the painting I have come to see. Then, returning to the work at hand, I become conscious, if only just, of an adjustment to my perception; that my perception has undergone a… Read more »

Tales from Te Papa : Cloud

As you know from my previous post, Tales from Te Papa went live on TVNZ6 on 1 September.  Over the coming weeks, we’ll post the mini-documentaries to the blog with more information – the stuff our staff weren’t able to fit into the Tales from Te Papa format and useful links to more info.  We’d love… Read more »

Framing McCahon on Steinbach

Installation in Toi Te Papa after reframing. © courtesy of the Colin McCahon Research and Publication Trust

This is my opening post in a series to discuss approaches to the framing of paintings. This first one is a response to William McAloon’s post: Freedom to act and takes his blog post as a point of departure. I look at some of the issues involving the sympathetic framing of modernist paintings, and what… Read more »

Freedom to act

Scared and Mondrian's last chrysanthemum, on show in Toi Te Papa.

  The other night we hung the two McCahons we bought last year – Scared and Mondrian’s last chrysanthemum. They’ve gone up in Toi Te Papa. In the mid-1970s Colin McCahon did a lot of paintings on a thick high quality paper called Steinbach. Legend has it that McCahon’s dealer Peter McLeavey bought 100 expensive… Read more »

Oh yes it can be dark here

Colin McCahon, Northland panels, 1958

In 1958 Colin McCahon spent four months on a study tour of the United States. Although the main point of the trip was to look at how museums were run — McCahon was then working as a curator at Auckland Art Gallery — he saw an awful lot of art: everything from Old Masters to… Read more »