Posts tagged with science at Te Papa

Te Papa Botany researchers study genome size in hebes

Te Papa Botany researchers Heidi Meudt, Jessie Prebble and Phil Garnock-Jones have recently co-authored a new paper in the Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society on the genus Veronica, which includes northern speedwells and New Zealand and Australian hebes. This paper is the first major publication from Heidi’s research stay in Oldenburg, Germany as an Alexander von… Read more »

He huia tangata tahi – there is but one person synonymous with the huia, the chief

photo of kahu kiwi me003714

Ngā rau kura – Precious feathers In 2007 I identified the birds in Te Papa’s Māori cloaks using microscopic analyses of feather down and museum bird skin comparisons. My findings have provided a deeper knowledge of the museum’s natural history and Māori collections but also an appreciation and understanding of Māori bird use at the… Read more »

Science Live: Expedition Snares Island for teachers

The rugged western cliffs of North-East Iland. Rising to over 120m - 06 Dec 2013. Photo Antony Kusabs, Te Papa.jpg

You may have seen on our blog that our next instalment of Science Live is happening on March 18. This episode will focus on Te Papa scientists’ recent trip to Snares Islands, about 200km south of Fiordland. Science Live is great way for teachers and students to learn about some of the important scientific work… Read more »

Thanks to Radio NZ for featuring our sharp-tail sunfish on Our Changing World.  It’s great to hear the specimen talked about so enthusiastically and knowledgeably. We’re looking forward to bringing you more news on the sunfish specimen once we have the results back from our laboratory and veterinary tests. Check www.blog.tepapa.govt.nz/category/sunfish to find out more about… Read more »

School’s in for sunfish science

On Monday morning 30 students from Brooklyn school huddled around a table in Te Papa’s fish lab. They were here to get a rare glimpse of a very rare fish – a sharp-tail sunfish. While the fish was still hidden under a wet sheet that was part of the defrosting process, scientist Andrew Stewart provided… Read more »

It’s a boy!

We think. Tom and Andrew have identified tissue from the sunfish’s gonads, which they believe to be testicular tissue. Gonad tissue in adult female sunfish is pink. Gonad tissue in adult male sunfish is white. However, our sharp-tail sunfish is an immature specimen and in immature sunfish the gonad tissue is…pink regardless of the sex!… Read more »

You’re probably aware by now, Te Papa’s scientists are conducting research on our sunfish specimen on 13 August 2013. We’ll be live-blogging and sharing the scientists’ findings through Facebook and Twitter. It’s a fantastic opportunity to sit in as scientists do their research on these rarely seen animals. What will happen to the sunfish after… Read more »