Posts tagged with research

Subtropical tree fern challenge

  • 1 C. Reproductive structures of Cyathea milnei, from the Kermadec Islands, in cultivation at Otari-Wilton’s Bush, Wellington. Photo Leon Perrie. © Te Papa.
  • 1 B. Cyathea milnei, from the Kermadec Islands, in cultivation at Otari-Wilton’s Bush, Wellington. Photo Leon Perrie. © Te Papa.
  • 1 A. Cyathea milnei, from the Kermadec Islands, in cultivation at Otari-Wilton’s Bush, Wellington. Photo Leon Perrie. © Te Papa.
  • 2 A. Cyathea kermadecensis, from the Kermadec Islands, in cultivation at Otari-Wilton’s Bush, Wellington. Photo Leon Perrie. © Te Papa.

I spent yesterday afternoon in the fernery of Otari-Wilton’s Bush, examining two tree fern species from New Zealand’s subtropical Kermadec Islands. More details below, including ‘why?’. But first, a challenge… Each of these Kermadec tree ferns is closely related to a (different) mainland New Zealand species. Can you tell which mainland species? One of the… Read more »

Science Live: Whalebirds – the mystery of the storm riders. Part 1. Come join us!

Fairy Prion in flight. Photo © Phil Battley.

On August 13th scientists at Te Papa hosted their first Science Live event.  The public were able to accompany some of the Museum’s ichthyologists into the lab to watch them dissect and process a sunfish that was over 2m long!  Now they didn’t have crowds of people marching into the Tory Street labs (there just… Read more »

The role of boundary objects

Museum Management and Curatorship, 27:1, 53-66.

There is some wonderful research taking place around young children and museums/galleries, the findings of which we can use to inform our teaching practice. What enables young children to better engage with exhibitions, and sustain interest back at the childcare centre? How can we help tamariki to make meaning from what they see and hear at… Read more »

Arthropteris climbing ferns

Arthropteris_tenella_climbing_reduced

I’m a co-author of a just-published scientific paper examining the evolution and classification of the Arthropteris climbing ferns. The paper was a real international collaboration, involving authors from China, Netherlands, France, United Kingdom, and New Zealand. It is unclear how many species there are of Arthropteris – probably somewhere between 10 and 20. They occur… Read more »

Thanks to Radio NZ for featuring our sharp-tail sunfish on Our Changing World.  It’s great to hear the specimen talked about so enthusiastically and knowledgeably. We’re looking forward to bringing you more news on the sunfish specimen once we have the results back from our laboratory and veterinary tests. Check www.blog.tepapa.govt.nz/category/sunfish to find out more about… Read more »

Sunfish: what do we know?

Te Papa and Auckland Museum scientists discuss how to proceed with the sunfish dissection. Photographer: Ruth Hendry © Te Papa

What have we learnt from our day of sunfish science? Sunfish are very hard to sex! The best we can say is that it’s a boy. We think. We’ll have to wait for the test results to determine conclusively whether it’s male or female. Jellyfish are delicious Although we can’t quiz a sunfish on their… Read more »

Sunfish science – live!

Exciting news! Tomorrow you can watch our scientists as they work on our rare sunfish specimen - live. From 2.30pm (NZ time) on 13 Aug 2013 Te Papa’s scientists will be carrying out research – and you can watch it online. Go to: http://webcast.tepapa.govt.nz/mediasite/catalog/catalogs/SunFish Join in! Te Papa’s scientists will be conducting research on our sunfish specimen… Read more »