Posts tagged with language week

“I have roots here…”: Climate change and Tuvaluan futures

GRADED STILLS1

This week is Tuvalu language week and the theme is “Tuvalu tau gana ko tou lagaifakalaga Tuvalu, your language keeps your culture and identity afloat”. Over the past week curators from the Pacific Cultures team have highlighted key Tuvalu artefacts and stories from Te Papa’s collections. Today’s blogpost is from Rachel Yates (Pacific Cultures Curator),… Read more »

Wearable art: Tuvalu style

This week is Tuvalu language week and the theme is “Tuvalu tau gana ko tou lagaifakalaga Tuvalu, your language keeps your culture and identity afloat”. Curators from the Pacific Cultures team are highlighting key Tuvalu artefacts and stories from Te Papa’s collections. It is busy at Te Papa right now, with tours for visitors of the… Read more »

Tuvalu language week 2013: eight things you should know about Tuvalu

A major of focus of Te Papa’s work is on documenting aspects of Intangible Cultural Heritage including oral histories and traditions, performances, knowledge around crafts, social practices, rituals and customs. Language is an important element of all of these activities. Regular readers of the blog will know that we have already celebrated the Samoan, Tongan… Read more »

Le vaiaso o le gagana Sāmoa (Sāmoan language week): Inspired inscriptions – mama (rings)

To celebrate le vaiaso o le gagana Samoa (Sāmoan language week) 26-31 May 2013, the Pacific Cultures curators are highlighting stories related to cultural treasures from Sämoa. European style rings, bracelets and brooches are popular forms of personal adornment made in Sāmoa from at least the 1920’s to the present day. They were typically constructed… Read more »

Islands style – Cook Islands (circa 1914)

This is the fourth blog where we highlight items from the collections as part of Cook Islands language week (6-10 August 2012). I have selected a small number of portraits by George Crummer who had a photography business in Rarotonga, Cook Islands from 1890.   Te Papa has an album and 227 (now badly deteriorated) negatives taken… Read more »

Celebrating Samoan Language Week 2012

This type of necklace is called an 'ulafala. It is most often worn by Samoan tulafale (orator chiefs). In the context of oratory performances, 'ulafala are important markers of social status. In other social and ceremonial situations they can help identify a special guest or simply act as an attractive adornment. 'Ulafala are made from segments of the pandanus fruit described by botantists as carpels, phalanges, or keys. The colour of the fruit spans a range from yellow through to orange and red when ripe. Red is a colour associated with high rank. This 'ulafala has been painted bright red, making it difficult to miss at any ceremony or function.

Sunday 27 May to Saturday 2 June 2012. Over the next week the Pacific Cultures team will be blogging about collection items from  Sämoa that relate to the theme of this years  Sämoan Language week  “O le Vāfealoa’i” “Strong and Respectful Relationships”. According to the Human Rights Commission website “Samoan Language Week was first promoted by Radio… Read more »