Posts tagged with Kahu Ora

A sense of touch

  • touch trolley
  • touch trolley
  • French whatu 2
  • French whatu 2

Written by Lucy Moore, Exhibition Supervisor One of the joys of being a Te Papa Host is when that ‘light bulb’ moment happens – when a visitor sees or experiences something profoundly new as a result of being in an exhibition.  We’ve had many of these moments in Kahu Ora in the last 2 months,… Read more »

Kōrero kākahu: Veranoa Hetet and Te Rōpu Miro

Veranoa Hetet (right) and Kahu Te Kanawa working on Veranoa's kakahu in the Weavers' Studio. Copyright Te Papa.

Veranoa Hetet and her group of weavers Te Rōpu Miro have been the weavers in residence for the  Kahu Ora Living Cloaks exhibition for the last few weeks. Time goes so fast and it’s hard to believe this will be their last weekend at Te Papa, as they finish on Sunday 2 September. Veranoa and her family have had a long… Read more »

Kahu Ora – Te Whare Pora

Hei tiki on display. On loan from the Morgan family.

In the past, this was a dedicated whare, or house, where aspects of the fine arts of Māori weaving were taught. Today, ‘Te Whare Pora’ is more of a state of mind of an expert senior weaver, who carries or embodies the values, skills and knowledge of this discipline, a most complex, sacred and revered… Read more »

Feathers of knowledge

  • The feathers closer up in Te Huka a Tai
  • The full Matariki Kakahu
  • Matariki feathers1 jpg
  • Hundreds of feathers!

  Ma te huruhuru te manu ka rere, with feathers a bird may fly. And by the sheer number of feathers that the education team received in the last few months, this bird could fly as far as Matariki!   This amazing paper feather kākahu (cloak) has been created by thousands of students from schools… Read more »

Tai Tamariki children’s kākahu – learning continues

  • Apolline transfers her plan on to her cloak. She studied images of three very different kākaku exhibited in Kahu Ora, and these provided inspiration for her cloak's finished design. Courtesy of Tai Tamariki Kindergarten
  • Apolline's plan for her kākahu: "I got my ideas from looking at lost of different types of korowai like flax, feathers, letters and shapes". Courtesy of Tai Tamaraki Kindergarten
  • Apolline's beautiful kākahu and label on display in the Weavers' Studio of the Kahu Ora exhibition. Courtesy of Tai Tamariki Kindergarten
  • Apolline and Urszula with the kākahu on display in the Weavers' Studio of the Kahu Ora exhibition. Courtesy of Tai Tamariki Kindergarten

by Becs Thomas, Assistant Head Teacher, Tai Tamariki Kindergarten The experience of having Tai Tamariki Kindergarten children’s kākahu displayed in Kahu Ora Living Cloaks has been a wonderful learning journey for our kindergarten community, both culturally and in the learning of exhibition protocol and process. This week the second of our children’s kakahu was put on display…. Read more »

Tai Tamariki Kindergarten childrens’ kakahu on display

Maia Waldegrave aged 4 from Tai Tamariki with her korowai. Courtesy of Tai Tamariki Kindergarten.

Tai Tamariki Kindergarten opened in Te Papa in early February 2010. It’s a unique and wonderful thing for a kindergarten to be located within a museum like Te Papa. The children and staff at Tai Tamariki are frequent visitors to the museum exhibitions, making use of all the learning opportunities and inspiration the museum provides. Kahu Ora… Read more »

Kōrero Kākahu: Building Kōrero

  • Matthew McIntyre-Wilson and a Te Papa host. Photograph by Pamela Lovis. Te Papa.
  • Matthew McIntyre-Wilson. Photograph by Matariki Williams. Te Papa.
  • Mark Sykes preparing the muka. Photograph by Matariki Williams. Te Papa.
  • Mark and some interested visitors. Photography by Pamela Lovis. Te Papa.

By Matariki Williams As many of you will probably know, it is school holidays time and Te Papa is buzzing with the energy of its many extra little visitors. Kahu Ora is no exception and when I went in to talk to the new weavers in residence, I was very happy to see the exhibition… Read more »

Kōrero Kākahu: Weaving Worldviews

Donna Head, Kohai Grace and Clare Butler. Photograph by Pamela Lovis

by Matariki Williams A highlight for me in Kahu Ora is a kākahu that is in the process of being cleaned by Textile Conservator Anne Peranteau. This kahu kurī is from between 1750 and 1840, of unknown provenance, and is made from strips of the pelt of a kurī (Polynesian dog) sewn onto a finely twined foundation… Read more »