Posts tagged with Gallipoli

Marks on the Landscape: Researching the Māori carvings at Gallipoli

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[This article was originally published in Te Papa newsletter, Te Auahi Turoa newsletter (3 July 2015) and has been reproduced here.] Kimihia, rangahaua, kei hea koutou ka ngaro nei? Tēnā ka riro ki Paerau, ki te huinga o Matariki, ka oti atu koutou e! Tangihia rā Te Ope Tuatahi i pae ki Karipori i te… Read more »

Gallipoli: The scale of our war – in poppies

Gallipoli: The scale of our war (c) Te Papa

‘This is very different from the unfeeling and emotionally distant historical coverage of a war. I felt a weight in my lower chest as I learned about the stories and suffering of the people, witnessed their rage and despair sculpted on their faces, and felt the ground tremble under my feet. I was immersed by… Read more »

Writing Gallipoli: The scale of our war – Part 2

How’s your war slang, cobber? A1 you reckon? Take the Great War Word Quiz Whence comes ‘the top brass’? The etymology of war In my earlier blog, I talked about writing from the soldiers’ perspective and creating our narrator – ‘the grunt’. An unexpected outcome was learning about the origins of many words we use… Read more »

Writing Gallipoli: The scale of our war – Part 1

Part of a letter written by a soldier named Kapper, Wellington Infantry Battalion, Gallipoli, 1915. Courtesy of Exhibition Historical Director Dr Christopher Pugsley.

In our latest Gallipoli blog, Te Papa’s Head Writer Frith Williams takes you behind the scenes with the writers of the exhibition. ‘By jove it was awful’: Writing from the soldiers’ perspective Gallipoli: the large-scale models by Weta Workshop, the powerful stories, the interactive experiences – they’ve all attracted a lot of attention. With any… Read more »

Building Gallipoli – the install

Rob Murphy working on the large scale figure of Sergeant Cecil Malthus. Photo by Weta Workshop.

In this Gallipoli: The scale of our war blog, Weta Workshop’s Rob Murphy talks about overseeing the installation of the exhibition. I’d only been working at Weta Workshop for about eight weeks when the first pieces of the Gallipoli exhibition started to hit the floor and work their way into the woodworking department. I still… Read more »

Why Gallipoli? Join us for an enduring conversation

I have been an avid listener of the BBC World Service’s wonderful series on the War that Changed the World, which is being broadcast locally by Radio New Zealand. Working in partnership with the British Council, the BBC has recorded a series of panel discussions in different cities around the world from Sarajevo to Dresden to Istanbul,… Read more »

Last week we held our biggest ever teacher preview which saw more than 200 teachers, from as far away as Tauranga, come to Te Papa to learn more about our new exhibition Gallipoli: The scale of our war. The preview started with Exhibition Creative Director Sir Richard Taylor giving a presentation on how his team… Read more »

NZ’s WWI hospital ship and Annie’s autographs

Maheno signature embroidery, 1915. Te Papa

This embroidered cloth was created on the New Zealand hospital ship Maheno as it steamed its way north to Egypt in July and August 1915. The words stitched on it are actually the signatures of the ship’s staff and crew. Two weeks ago this Te Papa object was placed into its display case in Gallipoli:… Read more »

Recreating the sounds of Māori at Gallipoli

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In what is probably a first for an exhibition like this Gallipoli: The scale of our war  (opening April 18) has its very own soundtrack and score to enhance the visitor experience. In this blog Te Papa researcher Amber Aranui talks about recreating the sounds of Māori at Gallipoli. For the part of the exhibition that… Read more »