Life through a burrowscope lens (Part 3) – subterranean Snares Islands

  • Parara through burrowscope
  • Parara
  • Fairy prion through burrowscope
  • Fairy prion

A Te Papa team recently visited the Snares Islands, 105 km south-southwest of Stewart Island, where they completed a range of seabird research projects. The most time-consuming task was a re-survey of the vast sooty shearwater (titi, or muttonbird) population there. Estimating the population size was based on two main parameters – the number of… Read more »

Canoe carvings of West Solomon Islands

nguzunguzu

Grace Hutton (Collection Manager Pacific Cultures) introduces us to Nguzunguzu, the guardians of war canoes from the Solomon Islands.  With Kesoko (a water spirit) putting travelling crew members at risk, Nguzunguzu were secured to the prow of every departing war canoe to ensure their safe passage. In the 1800s, on the islands of Choiseul, Santa Isabel,… Read more »

Jetboat botany

Heading up the Whanganui River in the Department of Conservation’s jetboat. Photo: Leon Perrie.

I was recently fortunate to be jetboated up the Whanganui River to collect plants. I hadn’t been in a jetboat before, but more significant than the fun of that novelty, it was a wonderful opportunity to get into an area whose botany has been little studied. The Department of Conservation’s Amy Hawcroft knew we were… Read more »

Snares Islands – 1947 and 2013 – In the footsteps of Edgar Stead (Part 11)

  • Snipe and chick
  • North-east coast
  • Penguin landing
  • Station Cove

Te Papa’s curator of terrestrial vertebrates Dr Colin Miskelly is researching the life and work of the Canterbury naturalist Edgar Stead (1881-1949). This includes re-taking Stead’s photos from the same photo-point, taking other images to illustrate his diaries, and describing how the ecology and wildlife of each of 11 islands has changed since Stead’s visits…. Read more »

Western Chain, Snares Islands – 1929 and 2013 – In the footsteps of Edgar Stead (Part 10)

  • Alan Tennyson (left) and Colin Miskelly collecting a blood sample from a fulmar prion on Toru Islet, Western Chain, November 2013. Image: Antony Kusabs, Te Papa.
  • Fulmar prion on Toru Islet, Western Chain, November 2013. Image: Colin Miskelly, Te Papa.
  • Salvin’s mollymawk and chick on Toru Islet, November 2013. Image: Colin Miskelly, Te Papa.
  • A Cape petrel on its nest on Toru Islet, November 2013. Image: Alan Tennyson, Te Papa.

Te Papa’s curator of terrestrial vertebrates Dr Colin Miskelly is researching the life and work of the Canterbury naturalist Edgar Stead (1881-1949). This includes re-taking Stead’s photos from the same photo-point, taking other images to illustrate his diaries, and describing how the ecology and wildlife of each of 11 islands has changed since Stead’s visits…. Read more »

Packed full of stunning pictures, detailed information and beautiful bird calls, NZ Birds Online is an online encyclopaedia of birds created in collaboration between Te Papa, DOC and OSNZ. We’re indebted to the photographers who’ve shared their images with us – and now the world! Sonja Ross is the next intrepid birder in our Meet the photographers series. Hailing from across the ditch,… Read more »

French Connection – Lisa Renard, intern at Te Papa

Lisa (on right) in a Ngati Toa exhibition team meeting

  Lisa Renard, Tamahou Temara and Tracey Kuiti on top of Wainuiomata Hill, Saturday 5 October 2013. Photo and caption courtesy of Tamahou Temara. Lisa Renard- Te Papa intern from the University of Strasbourg, France Lisa is a PhD student and studies at the University of Strasbourg in social and cultural anthropology with Prof Denis… Read more »

A Very Aztec Christmas

Decorating the Tree 2013, Photographer: Te Papa, © Te Papa

Written by Shonagh Lowerson-Head, Audience Engagement Intern On Tuesday night there was a very special delivery to Te Papa. Eight feet tall and evergreen – our 2013 Christmas tree! The Audience Engagement team had been expecting this arrival for some time, and had been busy creating decorations by hand to adorn it. But these were no… Read more »