Co-collecting in Guåhan: Inside the Weavers Studio

Mark Benavente and James Bamba

On our recent co-collecting project in Guåhan with Humanities Guåhan we spent time in the workspaces of indigenous Chamorro blacksmiths, carvers and weavers. The next blog in our ‘inside the artist studio’ series delves into the practices of two weaving practitioners, James Bamba and Mark Benavente. Both artists have collaborated on several projects and through their teaching… Read more »

Bruce Marshall and the volcanic vent mussel

  • Bathyxylophila excelsa holotype. North-east of Mernoo Bank, Chatham Rise; Te Papa M.075126. Te Papa image MA_I033908
  • A 19-year-old Bruce Marshall collecting fossil molluscs from the classic roadside fossil locality at Te Piki, between Whangaparaoa and Hicks Bay, in 1967. Image: Graham Spence, courtesy of Bruce Marshall, Te Papa
  • Bed of living Vulcanidas insolatus covered in bacteria, photographed in sunlight (submersible lights off ) at 140 m on the summit of the Giggenbach volcano. Image: Terry Kirby, taken during PiscesV dive P5–618 on 15 April 2005; reproduced courtesy
of Cornel de Ronde, GNS Science.
  • Scissurella marshalli holotype. Three Kings Islands, reef between Great Island & Farmer Rocks; Te Papa M.093992. Te Papa image MA_I052178

Bruce Marshall is a self-taught malacologist (shell expert) who has worked at Te Papa, and the previous National Museum, since 1976. As collection manager of molluscs, Bruce is responsible for a vast collection of several million specimens representing more than 4,700 New Zealand species. These range in size from tiny snails 0.48 mm in length… Read more »

Kia ora and welcome to my final reflections on my time working on the Remembering the Evergreen project at Te Papa. For an introduction to the project, please see my earlier post.   I have to admit the title of this post is a flight of fancy. I am unfortunately too young to have ever… Read more »

Connecting Past and Present

Close up of B.43877

This photograph below was lost the moment it was taken in 1929 or 1930. Mary Sporle, known as Dolly, proudly showed off her son Leslie for the camera at Wellington’s Berry & Co. studio with the intention of giving his grandparents a photograph of him. But her family believes she never returned to order prints, perhaps because the… Read more »

Nancy Adams, Wendy Nelson and the Three Kings’ seaweeds

  • Nancy Adams – National Museum staff portrait, August 1976. Photograph by Trevor Ulyatt. Te Papa MA_E.000345/031
  • $1.80 ’Three Wise Men’ Christmas stamp, 2009, Wellington, by Stephen Fuller, Southern Colour Print. The New Zealand Post Museum Collection, Gift of New Zealand Post Ltd., 1992. Te Papa PH001431
  • Wendy Nelson holding the New Zealand Marine Sciences Award that she received in 2007. Photographer Alan Blacklock, reproduced courtesy NIWA
  • Curdiea balthazar W.A.Nelson et al., collected 24 November 1998, Archway Island, Princes Islands, Three Kings Islands. Te Papa herbarium sheet A029596

The three kings (or three wise men or magi) are Christian icons – but how many people are aware that they have seaweeds named after them? The connection is via the Three Kings Islands north-west of Cape Reinga. Known as Manawatahi to Māori, they are one of only two localities in New Zealand that have… Read more »

Co-collecting in Guåhan: Inside the Artists’ Studio

Polishing metal

When you walk through an exhibition, it is easy to forget that the objects and taonga on display are the final products of a long creative process. While they may result from moments of inspiration or from countless studies, they are also formed by an artist’s ability to problem solve a number of physical and logistical… Read more »

10,000 images on New Zealand Birds Online

  • Red-necked stint nest with four eggs, Putorana Plateau, North-Central Siberia, July 2010. Image: Sergey Golubev, NZ Birds Online
  • Red-necked stint in breeding plumage, Bering Sea coast, southern Chukotka, June 2008. Image: Sergey Golubev, NZ Birds Online
  • Sergey Golubev (second from left) and comrades alongside their Mil Mi-8 helicopter, Putorana Plateau, North-Central Siberia. Image: Sergey Golubev
  • Emperor penguin chick being brooded by its parent, Haswell archipelago, Antarctica, September 2012. Image: Sergey Golubev, NZ Birds Online

The 10,000th image loaded on New Zealand Birds Online might seem an unlikely image to celebrate, but it has an astonishing back-story. It is a well-camouflaged clutch of four eggs, laid by a tiny wading bird that doesn’t even breed in New Zealand. The image was taken by Russian biologist Sergey Golubev on the remote… Read more »

Alan Baker and Maui’s dolphin

  • Diadema palmeri at 25 metres depth, Anne's Rock, Poor Knights Islands Marine Reserve, January 2016. Image: Crispin Middleton, seacologynz.com
  • Alan Baker in March 1981 (when Assistant Director of the National Museum) with the skull of a male strap-toothed whale (Mesoplodon layardii) from the Chatham Islands. Alexander Turnbull Library, Dominion Post Collection (PAColl-7327), EP/1981/1170/15
  • Maui’s dolphin (Cephalorhynchus hectori maui). Image: Department of Conservation and Auckland University
  • Knightaster bakeri Clark, 1972, Poor Knights Islands, Buddle landing. Te Papa EC.001151, collected by Alan Baker 19 May 1969. Te Papa image MA_I317970

Former museum director Alan Baker was a keen scuba diver with research interests in marine invertebrates (especially sea urchins and starfish), fish, whales and dolphins. Te Papa turned 150 years old on 8 December 2015. To celebrate 150 years since the opening of the Colonial Museum in Wellington, the exhibition ‘You called me WHAT?!’ is… Read more »

John Yaldwyn and the frog crab

  • Frog crab, Notosceles pepeke, named by John Yaldwyn and Elliot Dawson, 2000. The holotype was collected in 1998, between Three Kings Islands and Cape Reinga. Found at depths of 59–211 metres. Image by Richard Webber, Te Papa
  • Dr John Yaldwyn, Assistant Director of the National Museum, 1976. Photograph by Trevor Ulyatt. Te Papa (MA_E.00350/32a)
  • South Island stout-legged wren, Pachyplichas yaldwyni, 2005, by Paul Martinson, watercolour on paper. From the series ‘Extinct Birds of New Zealand’. Te Papa (2006-0010-1/2)
  • South Island stout-legged wren, Pachyplichas yaldwyni, 2005, by Paul Martinson, watercolour on paper. From the series ‘Extinct Birds of New Zealand’. Te Papa (2006-0010-1/2)
May 2006
Equipment: Cruse CS 185SL450 Synchron Light Scanner
Software Used: Adobe Photoshop CS 8.0

This file is property of Te Papa Press

Former museum director John Yaldwyn specialised in crustaceans, but he also had a keen interest in extinct New Zealand birds, archaeology, and history. Te Papa turned 150 years old on 8 December 2015. To celebrate 150 years since the opening of the Colonial Museum in Wellington, the exhibition ‘You called me WHAT?!’ is open on… Read more »

30 years on! Evergreen collages pay tribute to LGBTI rights and homosexual law reform

The signing of the Homosexual Law Reform Act on the 11 July 1986 was a pivotal moment in the fight for equality and human rights for gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and intersex people. The Act decriminalised sexual relations between gay men 16 years and over, but it was also hugely important in terms of the ongoing… Read more »