Māori Museum Educators – Te Papa meets Tairāwhiti

Pania & Julie

Grass roots programme developing is best achieved by: Not trying to invent the wheel Learning from those who have been in your shoes Targeting an area that shares your demographical target audience – In this case, a predominantly Māori audience Realising a potential win/win situation when it’s staring you in the face a.k.a quid pro… Read more »

Yes to a 164-year-old wedding dress and waistcoat

Sarah Rhodes (nee King) Maryann Rhodes and Williiam Barnard Rhodes, 1858. Copied from an ambrotype lent by Eddie Ryle-Hodges. PA Coll-5601.

Tuesday 27th September was an exciting day for the History team, as we welcomed descendants of prominent nineteenth-century Wellington entrepreneur William Barnard Rhodes and accepted two remarkable items into our collection. Rhodes’ great, great, great grandson Rupert Ryle-Hodges travelled from England to present to Te Papa a silk brocade wedding dress and waistcoat, worn by… Read more »

Bring on the bum roll… Dressing for Splendour

Robe à l’anglaise retroussé or English-back gown, 1770-1780. Te Papa.

Bottoms have been in the news again lately. The conversation has been around what must be the 21st century’s most famous derrière, that of American celebrity Kim Kardashian. Indeed, in May she received a Webby award for ‘breaking the internet’ – a feat achieved with a bare-bottomed shoot for Paper Magazine. More recently British actress Helen Mirren chimed in, praising the celebrity for promoting another body… Read more »

The Fishes of New Zealand wins top international award

Te Papa's fish team

Our fishes team have won with the highest award for zoological publishing – the first time a Kiwi book has even achieved this honour. The Fishes of New Zealand has been awarded the 2016 Whitley Medal by The Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales. The medal is regarded as Australia’s highest award for zoological publishing and this is… Read more »

Queer History objects

Poster titled 'Queer the Night' featuring a unicorn leaping across the moon, trailing a rainbow.

As we near the end of Queer History Month, I’ve been thinking about how objects at Te Papa work together to illuminate aspects of LGBTI (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex) life in New Zealand. One particular aspect I’ve noted is how society can both celebrate and marginalise particular groups of citizens regardless of legislation… Read more »

It’s a Bug’s Life: Our journey with science by Kiwi Kids ECC

With our community member, Robyn. Photograph by Kiwi Kids, © Kiwi Kids

In this post, we hear from Mia Wynyard, kaiako at Kiwi Kids ECC. Let’s find out what the ‘It’s a Bug’s Life’ project has meant for this Centre one year on… We are one year on from our ‘It’s a Bug’s Life’ experience and we can’t express just how much our thinking around science and nature has… Read more »

It’s a Bug’s Life – Impact of the project for Imagine Childcare

Making bird feeders, Photograph by Imagine Childcare, © Imagine Childcare

The ‘It’s a Bug’s Life’ education resource is on its way – but what has been the impact of this project so far? In this post, we hear from Imagine Childcare – one of our three ECE partnership groups. They are using the expertise they gained through our research to inform their Department of Conservation (DOC) ‘Habitat Heroes’ project… Read more »

Pukerua Bay School Museum visit European Splendour

Entering Splendour, Photograph by Justine Olsen, © Te Papa

The European Splendour 1500-1800 exhibition opened on Friday 16 September in Ngā Toi | Arts Te Papa. Our friends from Pukerua Bay School Museum: Aurelia (aged 9), Paddy (aged 11), Isaac (aged 12) and their teacher Cat Lunjevich, came to visit and spent time in conversation with our curators Justine and Mark. They have kindly written this post… Read more »

Marking Suffrage Day – remembering Frances Parker


Today marks the anniversary of women’s suffrage in New Zealand. 123 years ago New Zealand became the world’s first self-governing country to grant all women the right to vote in parliamentary elections. (It is worth noting, however, that although New Zealand women were the first to be granted the vote, women in the Cook Islands were the… Read more »

Wenceslaus Hollar: etching the 17th century

Etching - 17th century

Hollar vs. Lindauer So, you think Gottfried Lindauer is the most significant Czech artist in Te Papa’s collection? Wrong, certainly in terms of world fame, quantity and arguably in quality too! In Collections Online, Lindauer is trounced 68-21 by Wenceslaus Hollar (1607–77), whilst in our new Ngā Toi exhibition, Splendour, there are six Hollars alone… Read more »