Adkin diaries update: Your help still needed to bring them to life

  • Screenshot of a search result in Collections Online
  • Empty paddock
  • Two women and a baby sit on a picnic blanket
  • Man stands in a field holding a scythe

An update from history curator Kirstie Ross on the progress made transcribing selected diaries from those kept by Horowhenua farmer Leslie Adkin for 40 years. Thanks transcribers! A few weeks ago I invited blog readers to transcribe diaries from October 1917 to November 1918 kept by Leslie Adkin, a Levin farmer, photographer, husband and father,… Read more »

Hit rate high in high-country forget-me-not search

  • Ant and Zuri have found the perfect spot to make some research collections for the museum, near Rainbow ski field, January 2017. Photo by Jessie Prebble.
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  • Botany girl power! Zuri, Jessie and Heidi searching for Myosotis laeta in the Red Hills, January 2017. Photo by Ant Kusabs @ Te Papa (SP105625).
  • Ant finding yet another plant to add to the collection at Te Papa, Rainbow Ski Field, January 2017. Photo by Heidi Meudt @ Te Papa.

Field work is a key part of scientific research at Te Papa. Each year, Research Scientist Heidi Meudt spends about three weeks in the field collecting specimens for her taxonomic research on native New Zealand forget-me-nots (Myosotis). In January 2017, she travelled to three main areas in northern South Island (Cobb Valley, Mt Owen and ranges around… Read more »

Remembering tīvaevae designer Mama Maria Teokota’i Sila (1938 – 2017)

Mama-Maria-tivaevae

Pacific Collection Manager Grace Hutton and the rest of the Pacific Cultures team acknowledge the recent passing of artist and maker of tīvaevae Mama Maria Teokota’I. Kua ‘aere ki te po, Gone into the night In addition to being a very creative tīvaevae designer, Mama Maria was also a very religious and spiritual woman. She made… Read more »

Election 2017: Voting for the environment

This watercolour by Fanny Osborne of Adam’s mistletoe reminds us of its beauty.  At the time, it was known as Loranthus adamsii. It became extinct in the 1950s, probably because of forest clearance and possum browsing along with loss of pollinators and dispersers caused by introduced animals. Image copyright Auckland Museum; reproduced courtesy of Auckland Museum.

This is a series on five major election issues seen through the eyes of the national museum. In the lead-up to the 2017 General Election, we have linked each of these issues to an object, or a programme, run by Te Papa. In this post, Curator Botany Leon Perrie writes about the Environment. Some commentators… Read more »

Election 2017: A place to call home

Kiwi 1/4 Acre (1997) by Margaret Marr. Te Papa GH007400

This is a series on five major election issues seen through the eyes of the national museum. In the lead-up to the 2017 General Election, we have linked each of these issues to objects from the collection, or education programmes, run by Te Papa. In this post, Senior Curator History Claire Regnault writes about Housing…. Read more »