Teacher Professional Development: Visual Culture and Visual Arts in ECE (Mark II)

  • The inhabitants of Saga, Photographer: Te Papa, © Te Papa
  • The inhabitants of Saga, Photographer: Te Papa, © Te Papa
  • The inhabitants of Saga, Photographer: Te Papa, © Te Papa
  • The inhabitants of Saga, Photographer: Te Papa, © Te Papa

Due to the  interest in our first Visual Culture and Visual Arts PD, we offered another session to Early Childhood Teachers this past weekend (Saturday, 26th April).  While the content of the programme differed from the first (due to maintenance occurring in the Ngā Toi | Arts Te Papa gallery space), we maintained the same goal – to build teacher knowledge,… Read more »

Berry and Co’s proxy portraits

Copy of a portrait of two unidentified soldiers [inscribed Johnson]; 1914-1920; Berry & Co

At Te Papa, photos of 30 unidentified World War soldiers are on display in The Berry Boys: Naming the Kiwi faces of War. These men had their photographs taken at the Berry & Co studio sometime during the war, but we no longer know who they are. The soldier subjects in another 30 ‘Berry Boys’… Read more »

Traces of Pukehinahina / The Battle of Gate Pā in Te Papa – The New Zealand Wars

1992-0035-1631/9B
Watercolour
W.F. Gordon. 1869
Purchased 1916

“The Battle of Gate Pa was arguably the most important battle of the New Zealand Wars, in terms of both its political effects and its wider implications for military technology. Historians have failed to appreciate its full significance because the contemporary British interpretations, on which they rely, were dominated by the shock of defeat and… Read more »

The Berry Boys: Badges, Buttons & Brooches

Portrait of an unidentified soldier and three unidentified women inscribed Brown, 1914-1919, Wellington. Berry & Co. Purchased 1998 with New Zealand Lottery Grants Board funds. Te Papa

Today, The Berry Boys: Naming the Kiwi faces of World War I opened at Te Papa on level 4. Part of this intimate exhibition explains how we have used uniform badges to help us identify some of the soldiers photographed by Berry & Co. But some of the portraits in the collection show us that the… Read more »

Haere Ra Royals

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and George left New Zealand this afternoon for Sydney, Australia. The Cambridge’s departure was less scenic than the Duke’s grandparents’ at the end of January 1954. On that occasion, just over 60 years ago, the royal yacht, the SS Gothic, made an unscheduled visit to Milford Sound in Fiordland, on the… Read more »

Royal fashion trend-setters

George III First Shirt, 1738. Linen. Gift of xxx,

When Prince George had his New Zealand playdate on 9 April his romper suit with sailboat smocked on the front, inspired parents to rush out and buy up the outfit by British designer Rachel Riley. Like many royals before his clothing both inspires and reflects the fashions of the time. A baby’s ‘first shirt’ in Te Papa’s collection,… Read more »

Royal highlights: bedrooms for the Duke and Duchess

In 1901 the Duke and Duchess of Cornwall & York, the future King George V and Queen Mary (for more on this royal couple see Mark Stocker’s post from last week), toured the Southern Hemisphere to thank commonwealth countries for sending troops to support Britain in the Boer War. As part of the New Zealand… Read more »

Homecrafted Royals

Out of all of the Royal memorabilia circulating in the world my favourite items tend to be home made. ‘Fanmade’ objects always resonate with me more than commercially produced souvenirs –infused as they often are with love and obsession. In 2012 the Merrick Girls gifted Te Papa a cushion,  intensely embroidered by their mother Nancy, who in… Read more »

Where have all the royal souvenirs gone?

Stephanie Gibson, Te Papa’s Curator of Contemporary Life & Culture writes: It was with great sadness last week that I read about the demise of royal visit souvenirs (‘No royal knick-knacks thanks, we’re Kiwis’, The Dominion Post, 1 April 2014). According to the journalist ‘tacky royal collectibles are becoming relics of a bygone age’. There… Read more »