Posts categorized as Whales

W.R.B. Oliver – jack-of-all-trades and master of most

  • Chatham Island red-crowned parakeet (Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae chathamensis Oliver, 1930) – named by Oliver in his first edition of New Zealand birds. Image: Dave Crouchley, Department of Conservation/New Zealand Birds Online
  • Reginald Oliver collecting plants at Wilmot Pass, Fiordland, March 1927. Image by J.T. Salmon, Dominion Museum. Te Papa (MA_B.014931)
  • Dominion Museum building, 1984 (then known as the National Museum). Image: Mark Strange, Te Papa (MA_B.016888)
  • IShepherd’s beaked whale (Tasmacetus shepherdi Oliver 1937) stranded at Ōteranga Bay, Wellington, September 1998. Photograph by Peter Simpson, Department of Conservation Te Papa Atawhai (10041750)

Te Papa turned 150 years old on 8 December 2015. To celebrate 150 years since the opening of the Colonial Museum in Wellington, the exhibition ‘You called me WHAT?!’ is open on Level 3 until the end of 2016. The exhibition, and this series of blogs, explore the history of the museum by showcasing some… Read more »

Whale tooth graffiti – Fiji language week 2014 (slideshow)

detail

This is our last blogpost for Fiji Language Week 2014 where the theme has been ‘Noqu vosa, noqu iyau talei’ – My language, my treasure’. I thought I’d share a few examples where language actually appears on one of Fiji’s treasures. Tabua (pronounced  tambua – b=mb) are pierced and braided whales’ teeth, originally taken from… Read more »

Whales in New York

  • Installation shots of Whales:Giants of the Deep, on at the American Museum of Natural History in New York
  • Installation shots of Whales:Giants of the Deep, on at the American Museum of Natural History in New York
  • Installation shots of Whales:Giants of the Deep, on at the American Museum of Natural History in New York
  • Installation shots of Whales:Giants of the Deep, on at the American Museum of Natural History in New York

Te Papa’s exhibition Whales:Giants of the Deep opens at the American Museum of Natural History in New York on Saturday 23 March. This blockbuster exhibition has been seen by over 1 million visitors during its  4 year tour in North America. Over 350,000 people visited the exhibition in Chicago alone. Media interest is strong with… Read more »

World’s rarest whale revealed to the world.

M traversii mother

Even in this well-informed age it’s surprising how much we still don’t know about the natural world – especially the oceans!    All whales must come to the surface to breathe, despite this the Spade-tooth whale Mesoplodon traversii (Gray, 1874), an animal over 5m in length, has never been see alive, and until 31 December 2010 no one… Read more »