Posts categorized as Science Live @ Te Papa

Science Live: Whalebirds – the mystery of the storm riders. Part 3. Prion lice

Giant body louse (male)

Here is the third instalment in our series of blogs all about prions!  This is in preparation for our upcoming Science Live event on Oct 22nd at 1:50 pm NZ time when you can accompany us into the lab via live streaming (a permanent link to the YouTube video can be found below).  For more details… Read more »

Science Live: Whalebirds – the mystery of the storm riders. Part 2. What’s in a name?

  • Elizabeth Crotty about to embark in a dissection.
  • Whale boat, Carnley Harbour. Te Papa object O.007069
  • Scrimshaw from Te Papa collection (GH003150/3)
  • Measuring the wing of a prion © Lizzy Crotty

Here is the second instalment in our series of blogs all about prions!  This is in preparation for our upcoming Science Live event on Oct 22nd at 1:50 pm NZ time when you can accompany us into the lab via live streaming (a permanent link to the YouTube video can be found below).  For more details… Read more »

Science Live: Whalebirds – the mystery of the storm riders. Part 1. Come join us!

Fairy Prion in flight. Photo © Phil Battley.

On August 13th scientists at Te Papa hosted their first Science Live event.  The public were able to accompany some of the Museum’s ichthyologists into the lab to watch them dissect and process a sunfish that was over 2m long!  Now they didn’t have crowds of people marching into the Tory Street labs (there just… Read more »

Can early years children learn from live science?

Max's sunfish drawing. Photographer: Becs Thomas © Tai Tamariki

Our sunfish science extravaganza was a huge hit with adult science enthusiasts from across New Zealand – and worldwide! But could the same setup work for very young children? Mel Dash, one of Te Papa’s audience engagement team, had the inspired idea of inviting the 3 and 4 year olds from Tai Tamariki Kindergarten, to… Read more »

Sunfish: what do we know?

Te Papa and Auckland Museum scientists discuss how to proceed with the sunfish dissection. Photographer: Ruth Hendry © Te Papa

What have we learnt from our day of sunfish science? Sunfish are very hard to sex! The best we can say is that it’s a boy. We think. We’ll have to wait for the test results to determine conclusively whether it’s male or female. Jellyfish are delicious Although we can’t quiz a sunfish on their… Read more »

Last meal

Tom Trnski has had a good look inside our sunfish’s stomach. He’s discovered that the last meal the sunfish probably ate was jellyfish – tasty for sunfish, but not so tasty for us! Inside the stomach were several long jellyfish tentacles. There were even some still inside the mouth! It looks like the sunfish probably… Read more »

It’s a boy!

We think. Tom and Andrew have identified tissue from the sunfish’s gonads, which they believe to be testicular tissue. Gonad tissue in adult female sunfish is pink. Gonad tissue in adult male sunfish is white. However, our sharp-tail sunfish is an immature specimen and in immature sunfish the gonad tissue is…pink regardless of the sex!… Read more »

Scientists from Auckland Museum and Te Papa are busy preparing the sharp-tail sunfish for dissection. We have our own photographers and photographers from the Dominion Post taking images of the specimen. This will help us to record what the specimen looked like as soon as it was taken from the freezer. Over time, whether the specimen… Read more »

Sunfish science is live and online!

Scientists measuring the sharp-tail sunfish. Photographer: Ruth Hendry (c) Te Papa

Our livestream is now over. Thanks for joining in! We’ll put the video online once we have uploaded it. You can view it here: http://webcast.tepapa.govt.nz/mediasite/catalog/catalogs/SunFish Due to popular demand from you, we’ve started the livestream early. Watch live here: http://webcast.tepapa.govt.nz/mediasite/catalog/catalogs/SunFish You can watch on your mobile or your desktop. Even better, soon you’ll be able… Read more »