Posts categorized as Research

Science Live: Whalebirds – the mystery of the storm riders. Part 4. Sinister Fairy Prions

  • Kyle Morrison on his way back from the Snares. Photo © Phil Battley.
  • A pair of fairy prions looking deceptively peaceful in a rock crevice on The Snares. Photo © Kyle Morrison.
  • Fairy Prion rests in defeat. Photo © Kyle Morrison.
  • Fairy Prions do battle over a disputed nest site. Photo © Kyle Morrison.

Here is the forth instalment in our series of blogs all about prions!  This is in preparation for our upcoming Science Live event on Oct 22nd at 1:50 pm NZ time when you can accompany us into the lab via live streaming (a permanent link to the YouTube video can be found below).  For more details please… Read more »

Science Live: Whalebirds – the mystery of the storm riders. Part 3. Prion lice

Giant body louse (male)

Here is the third instalment in our series of blogs all about prions!  This is in preparation for our upcoming Science Live event on Oct 22nd at 1:50 pm NZ time when you can accompany us into the lab via live streaming (a permanent link to the YouTube video can be found below).  For more details… Read more »

Science Live: Whalebirds – the mystery of the storm riders. Part 2. What’s in a name?

  • Elizabeth Crotty about to embark in a dissection.
  • Whale boat, Carnley Harbour. Te Papa object O.007069
  • Scrimshaw from Te Papa collection (GH003150/3)
  • Measuring the wing of a prion © Lizzy Crotty

Here is the second instalment in our series of blogs all about prions!  This is in preparation for our upcoming Science Live event on Oct 22nd at 1:50 pm NZ time when you can accompany us into the lab via live streaming (a permanent link to the YouTube video can be found below).  For more details… Read more »

Save Kiwi Week

Te Papa researcher Sarah Jamieson with an adult female North Island brown kiwi. Photo credit: Kyle Morrison.

This week is Save Kiwi week. Te Papa researchers have a long history of studying kiwi. Our kiwi researchers include: Sarah Jamieson, who previously worked at Massey University studying the breeding ecology and habitat preferences of North Island brown kiwi. Alan Tennyson, who led the formal description of a new kiwi species – rowi/Okarito brown kiwi (Apteryx… Read more »

Science Live: Whalebirds – the mystery of the storm riders. Part 1. Come join us!

Fairy Prion in flight. Photo © Phil Battley.

On August 13th scientists at Te Papa hosted their first Science Live event.  The public were able to accompany some of the Museum’s ichthyologists into the lab to watch them dissect and process a sunfish that was over 2m long!  Now they didn’t have crowds of people marching into the Tory Street labs (there just… Read more »

A native species re-recorded for Wellington

  • Underside of a frond of Asplenium lamprophyllum, showing the comparatively long sori (reproductive structures). Photo © Leon Perrie.
  • Asplenium lamprophyllum. Photo © Leon Perrie.
  • Distribution map of Asplenium lamprophyllum, based on specimens in Te Papa’s herbarium. Other herbaria have records of the species from northern Taranaki and Whanganui. Click for a page with a zoomable map.
  • Asplenium_lamprophyllum_2_Ngauranga4_reduced

The Wellington Botanical Society has just added* (* actually it is confirmed, rather than added; see update below) another species to the list of native plants known from Wellington – the fern Asplenium lamprophyllum. To find (* rediscover) such a relatively big species so close to New Zealand’s capital city may seem a little surprising. Just… Read more »

The role of boundary objects

Museum Management and Curatorship, 27:1, 53-66.

There is some wonderful research taking place around young children and museums/galleries, the findings of which we can use to inform our teaching practice. What enables young children to better engage with exhibitions, and sustain interest back at the childcare centre? How can we help tamariki to make meaning from what they see and hear at… Read more »

Making sense of snarge

Snarge identified as long tailed skua. Photo by Alan Tennyson.

Birds can cause serious damage to aircraft. A recent example is the 2009 US Airways flight that hit a flock of Canada geese on take-off and had to make an emergency landing on the Hudson River. In this case no one was seriously injured but there are many examples of fatalities caused by bird strikes…. Read more »

Te Aka Matua Reading Room opens

Te Aka Matua Reading Room Photographer: Norm Heke © Te Papa

The Te Aka Matua Reading Room was blessed and reopened in its stunning new space on Te Papa’s Level 4 mezzanine on the 28th June. It  is a welcoming, comfortable area to work in, it contains the non-science rare book collections, museology books, Carter Collection and many other resources.   The Reading Room also holds a special and unique… Read more »