Posts categorized as Plants

Wild plants in town – a homage

  • I love the way plants grow / all over the place. / Weeds, I read once, / are ‘plants out of place’. / But, who’s to say? / Who’s to say?  Image © to and courtesy of jMj.
  • Epuni Street / Aerial roots / a source of / endless fascination for me. / What am I taking in / from the air / just by / being in it.  Image © to and courtesy of jMj.
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  • Above Strathmore. / 6” Coastal battery / on the Hills above Strathmore / 70th Heavy Battery / Guns. Not much beside remains. / Taupata - / 6” too?  Image © to and courtesy of jMj.

Plants can grow in what appear to be the strangest places.  This can be frustrating for property owners (e.g., grass in the gutter; footpaths cracked by pohutukawa roots). But our view of plants is often from our own animal-centric perspective; unlike our zoological kin, an individual plant doesn’t have the option of moving to a… Read more »

Oops-a-daisy! How many flowers do you see?

  • Marlborough rock daisy disc floret (top) and ray floret (bottom). Note the long petal on the ray floret.
  • Marlborough rock daisy ray floret.
  • Marlborough rock daisy disc floret. Note the reduced petals and long stigma.
  • Marlborough rock daisies (Pachystegia insignis).

How many flowers do you see in the photo below? Two is the obvious answer, but there are far more than two flowers in the picture. Each daisy ‘flower’ is actually made up of numerous tiny flowers, also called florets. The Marlborough rock daisies pictured above have two types of florets. Around the outside are… Read more »

Herbarium specimen preparation of succulent plants

  • Cotyledon orbiculata, Hue te Taka Peninsula. Photo: Antony Kusabs, Te Papa.
  • Cotyledon orbiculata specimen. The clear bag will be folded and placed in the left hand packet. Photo: Jean-Claude Stahl, Te Papa
  • Cotyledon orbiculata, pig's ear, Hue te Taka Peninsula. Photo: Antony Kusabs, Te Papa
  • Cotyledon orbiculata (pig's ear) leaf, with refuse of the skinning process in background. Photo: Antony Kusabs, Te Papa.

Part of my role as Collection Manager at Te Papa herbarium is contributing to the further development of our dried plant collection. At the herbarium we are interested in collecting indigenous and naturalised New Zealand plant species for future scientific investigation and as an historical record. One of our recent collection development projects focused on… Read more »

Jovellana sinclairii flowering in Bush City

Flowers of Jovellana sinclairii, in Te Papa’s Bush City. Photo Leon Perrie. © Te Papa.

Te Papa’s Bush City is currently graced by a good display of sprays of the white, bell-like flowers of Jovellana sinclairii. If you’re visiting, you can see them beside the waterfall, on the lower track. Jovellana sinclairii is not a common plant in the wild. You’re most likely to find this large herb beside streams… Read more »

Wellington Botanical Society Bulletin 2012

Mänuka, Leptospermum scoparium. One of many native plants put to many uses. Captain Cook used it with rimu to make beer.

The botanically-inclined may find something of interest in the just-published Wellington Botanical Society Bulletin. Number 54 includes: the uses of some common native plants. notes on the propagation of native plants. accounts of the diatoms and bryophytes recorded during the 2011 bioblitz on Mana Island. the use of names in botany. detailed accounts of the… Read more »

Help with floating fern

Azolla plants often become red in full sunlight, and they can become so abundant that they carpet ponds, drains, and other still bodies of water. This is Azolla filiculoides in a pond on Mana Island, Wellington. Photo Leon Perrie. © Te Papa.

I’ve recently learnt that the introduced Azolla pinnata (ferny azolla) has been found in the Wellington region. I’m interested in its distribution and would be grateful for help in looking for more. Azolla plants are fairly easy to spot: look for a red plant covering still bodies of water. Azolla are ferns, believe it or… Read more »

Where to find new species?

Biodiversity-treasure - inside one of Te Papa’s two botany collection stores.  Copyright Te Papa.

Where would you go to find a new species? Perhaps somewhere remote and little-visited, especially if it is ecologically unusual – New Caledonia maybe… Well, instead, how about inside Te Papa’s collections, because that’s where I first discovered a new species of Gleichenia tangle fern. A lot of biodiversity remains to be documented, particularly amongst… Read more »