Posts categorized as Ferns

Tangle ferns untangled

The undersides of the four species of Gleichenia tangle fern accepted for New Zealand. From top: alpine tangle fern, Gleichenia alpina; tangle fern, waewae-kötuku, Gleichenia dicarpa; pitted tangle fern, Gleichenia inclusisora; carrier tangle, matua-rarauhe, Gleichenia microphylla. Scale bar = 2 cm. Composite image © Te Papa.

A focus for my research in 2014 has been preparing an account on the Gleicheniaceae fern family for the online Flora of New Zealand. More on the revolutionary online Flora of New Zealand. The Gleicheniaceae in New Zealand comprises nine species in the genera Dicranopteris (one species, restricted to central North Island thermal areas), Gleichenia… Read more »

A new tree fern

The newly recognised Dicksonia lanata subsp. hispida. Fairly common in the northern North Island, usually in kauri forests. Photo Leon Perrie. © Te Papa.

New Zealand has a new tree fern – kind of. Te Papa Research Fellow Patrick Brownsey and I have recently recognised a subspecies within the stumpy tree fern, tuokura, Dicksonia lanata.  The new name is Dicksonia lanata subspecies hispida.  It is only kind of a new tree fern, as it was first recognised as something different… Read more »

Subtropical tree fern challenge

  • 1 C. Reproductive structures of Cyathea milnei, from the Kermadec Islands, in cultivation at Otari-Wilton’s Bush, Wellington. Photo Leon Perrie. © Te Papa.
  • 1 B. Cyathea milnei, from the Kermadec Islands, in cultivation at Otari-Wilton’s Bush, Wellington. Photo Leon Perrie. © Te Papa.
  • 1 A. Cyathea milnei, from the Kermadec Islands, in cultivation at Otari-Wilton’s Bush, Wellington. Photo Leon Perrie. © Te Papa.
  • 2 A. Cyathea kermadecensis, from the Kermadec Islands, in cultivation at Otari-Wilton’s Bush, Wellington. Photo Leon Perrie. © Te Papa.

I spent yesterday afternoon in the fernery of Otari-Wilton’s Bush, examining two tree fern species from New Zealand’s subtropical Kermadec Islands. More details below, including ‘why?’. But first, a challenge… Each of these Kermadec tree ferns is closely related to a (different) mainland New Zealand species. Can you tell which mainland species? One of the… Read more »

Doodia rasp ferns become Blechnum hard ferns

  • Blechnum neglectum, previously Pteridoblechnum neglectum, found only in north-eastern Australia. Right: Blechnum diversifolium, from New Caledonia. Blechnum diversifolium is more closely related to the species previously placed in Pteridoblechnum than it is to most species of Blechnum. Photos Leon Perrie. Composite © Te Papa.
  • Blechnaceae ferns are common in several parts of the world. For instance, all New Zealanders will be familiar with kiokio and its relatives in the genus Blechnum, colloquially known as “hard ferns” because of their coriaceous fronds.  Kiokio (Blechnum novae-zelandiae) is a common sight on road cuttings, amongst other habitats, and occurs throughout the country. Photo Leon Perrie. © Te Papa.
  • Left: rasp fern, Blechnum parrisiae, previously called Doodia australis, occurs in both Australia and New Zealand. Right: Blechnum gibbum, from New Caledonia. Blechnum gibbum is more closely related to the species formerly placed in Doodia than it is to most species of Blechnum. Photos Leon Perrie. Composite © Te Papa.
  • Blechnum orientale, in Fiji. Most species of Blechnum in New Zealand are “dimorphic”, with obviously different fertile and sterile fronds. (The exception is Blechnum fraseri, which is only partially dimorphic.) However, many overseas Blechnum are “monomorphic” like Blechnum orientale, which is widespread in the tropics from Asia through Australia to the Pacific.  Photo Leon Perrie. (c) Te Papa.

A key principle in the scientific classification of animals, plants, and other living things is that the system of scientific names reflects their relationships. This is because there is only a single evolutionary history, and it provides an objective basis by which to name life. As we learn more about these evolutionary relationships, scientific names… Read more »

What ferns were found during the ‘Find ferns…’ competition?

  • Button fern, Pellaea rotundifolia, was one of the most frequently reported ferns. Photo (c) Leon Perrie.
  • Hound's tongue, Microsorum pustulatum, was one of the most frequently reported ferns. Photo (c) Leon Perrie.
  • Male fern, Dryopteris filix-mas, is an introduced weed in New Zealand.  It was reported several times. Photo (c) Leon Perrie.
  • Mamaku, Cyathea medullaris, was one of the most frequently reported ferns.  Photo (c) Leon Perrie.

Thanks to those who entered our ‘Find ferns and win!’ competition as part of our Science Live: The Secret World of Ferns broadcast. And, congratulations to the lucky winner! Watch The Secret World of Ferns. Lots of different ferns were spotted – some 44 species. One of the interesting finds was reported by shona_t via… Read more »

Science Live: Secret World of Ferns – today!

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Tune into Science Live: Secret World of Ferns today from 2.00pm. You can watch the livestream on the YouTube player below, or visit Te Papa’s YouTube channel. Get involved! What you would like to know about ferns? You can ask Leon Perrie, Curator of Botany, your questions via: Email: sciencelive@tepapa.govt.nz Twitter: using the hashtag #sciencelivetepapa… Read more »

As part of Science Live: Secret World of Ferns, we want to find out what type of fern you are! If one of the statements below sounds like you, click on it to reveal your secret fern personality… Are you easily embarrassed? Sounds like you’re: rasp fern (Doodia australis).The new fronds of rasp fern are… Read more »