Posts categorized as Ngā Toi Arts Te Papa

Hosting in Nga Toi in summer

by-vistoria

Working in Ngā Toi over summer was interesting because it was so vibrant.  Swarms of visitors off buses, cruise ships and from different backgrounds suddenly appeared.  Having an art gallery located within the museum certainly attracts those who may not normally visit! It was hectic introducing the feast of art on display,  giving out I SPY art trails, Art Detective Kits and audio guides to families, as well as keeping the Whare Toi (art… Read more »

Indigenous art curatorial practice; ideas and observations

  • Peter Robinson, Retorts and comebacks
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I am blogging a paper, as below, written in response to an invitation to talk about Indigenious art curatorial practice for the recent Pacific Art Association XII International Symposium. The symposium was held in Auckland during the week of 14 – 17 March 2016 and in a number of venues across the city including Orakei Marae,… Read more »

Thinking through time – Inspired: Ceramics and jewellery shaped by the past

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On Friday March 18 Te Papa opens a new exhibition on Level 6:- Inspired: Ceramics and jewellery shaped by the past. The exhibition draws on contemporary and historic objects from Te Papa and considers how objects can be connected across time. The phrase ‘thinking through time’ relates to an important part of the practices of… Read more »

Margaret Butler: An Invisible Sculptor?

Butler-portrait

I recently delivered a paper on the New Zealand sculptor Margaret Butler (1883-1947) at the University of Otago conference, ‘Making Women Visible’. Although one or two of her sculptures are occasionally exhibited, she is next to invisible to the wide public, certainly far more obscure than her older contemporary Frances Hodgkins. Yet whenever I see… Read more »

How are we looking? Photo sharing gives us a glimpse into how we look

Mount doom covered in snow. Photograph and Instagram post by txnnxr. All rights reserved

Amos Mann, a Digital Content Producer at Te Papa, finds tensions, connections, and conversations within #tepapaphoto, an Instagram photo sharing project currently underway. We love taking photos. We love sharing photos. And now, more easily than ever before, from across town and across the world, we can instantly show each other where we are, what we’re doing,… Read more »

Out of our minds – Watkins, Didion and the Malakoff Diggins

malakoff diggins watkins

  Despite their age Carleton Watkins’ photographs have an enduring appeal. Their large scale and simple beauty makes them stand out amongst the vast array of nineteenth century landscape photographs. Often Watkins’ photographs don’t simply document or show facts – they disorient our sense of identity and place in front of a scene. Sometimes finding… Read more »

Over the Christmas holidays, Australian researcher Stephen Marshall visited Te Papa to view a little-known watercolour in our collection: John William Tristram’s ‘A Tremulous Dusk‘, painted in 1904. Stephen is currently writing a book on the artist, and wrote this blog to tell us more about the beautiful painting he found.  A rare early twentieth… Read more »

Forceps delivery

John Foster. Untitled – from the 'Forceps Delivery' series. 1978. Lithograph on paper. Purchased 2015. Te Papa (2015-0026-2)

The late American writer Christopher Largen once said: “Birth is an experience that demonstrates that life is not merely function and utility, but form and beauty.” If that is so, why has childbirth been such an unusual subject for modern and contemporary artists? Motherhood is a relatively common subject in Western Art, from depictions of the… Read more »

Wineera family portrait : A picture tells a thousand words.

  • Wi Mekerei Rawiri
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A PICTURE TELLS A THOUSAND WORDS Stories from He iti whetū : Ngāti Toa portraits. Ngā Toi Arts Te Papa: Kanohi Kitea Māori & Pacific Encounters   This family portrait from the turn of last century is a remarkable and striking statement about family and identity. Titled Ko mātou me ā mātou tamariki, mokopuna hoki, or ‘Ourselves, our children and grandchildren’, this collection… Read more »