Posts categorized as behind the scenes

It’s a Bug’s Life: Our journey with science by Kiwi Kids ECC

With our community member, Robyn. Photograph by Kiwi Kids, © Kiwi Kids

In this post, we hear from Mia Wynyard, kaiako at Kiwi Kids ECC. Let’s find out what the ‘It’s a Bug’s Life’ project has meant for this Centre one year on… We are one year on from our ‘It’s a Bug’s Life’ experience and we can’t express just how much our thinking around science and nature has… Read more »

It’s a Bug’s Life – Impact of the project for Imagine Childcare

Making bird feeders, Photograph by Imagine Childcare, © Imagine Childcare

The ‘It’s a Bug’s Life’ education resource is on its way – but what has been the impact of this project so far? In this post, we hear from Imagine Childcare – one of our three ECE partnership groups. They are using the expertise they gained through our research to inform their Department of Conservation (DOC) ‘Habitat Heroes’ project… Read more »

Pukerua Bay School Museum visit European Splendour

Entering Splendour, Photograph by Justine Olsen, © Te Papa

The European Splendour 1500-1800 exhibition opened on Friday 16 September in Ngā Toi | Arts Te Papa. Our friends from Pukerua Bay School Museum: Aurelia (aged 9), Paddy (aged 11), Isaac (aged 12) and their teacher Cat Lunjevich, came to visit and spent time in conversation with our curators Justine and Mark. They have kindly written this post… Read more »

Adorn yourself in Ngā Toi|Arts Te Papa!

Adorn yourself! Photograph by Carmel Russell, © Te Papa

The Learning Innovation team are very excited about the new activities featuring in Te Whare Toi in this upcoming season of Ngā Toi | Arts Te Papa. We have been playing around with the wonderful range of dress-ups for ‘Adorn yourself!’ in the office this afternoon. This activity relates to the exhibitions European Splendour 1500—1800 and… Read more »

A new microscope: how improved technology is making our work easier

Jean-Claude inspect some specimens under the new macroscope, 2016. Te Papa.

Imaging specialist, Jean-Claude Stahl, has been getting to grips with our new microscope which can take incredibly sharp pictures of shells as tiny as a grain of sand. Being able to take high quality, close-up images, is an important part of our scientist’s role in documenting species from the natural environment. With older technology, this was no… Read more »

Hello from the Tauranga Art Gallery

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  • Garments in waiting.
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  • Werta, 2005 from the Vagrant's Reception Centre wears a woollen skirt and bodice dating from c. 1895. Image courtesy of Yvonne Todd.

In 2014 I was invited by the City Gallery in Wellington to curate a ‘Frock Room’ as part of Creamy Psychology, a major retrospective exhibition of photographer Yvonne Todd. The ‘Frock Room’ featured glamorous gowns from Todd’s personal collection which she used to create portraits of various women, real and imagined. I am currently working with Yvonne… Read more »

In this increasingly digital world, success in website content and usability is reliant on understanding our audiences’ needs through data, user research, and Search Engine Optimization (SEO). Our guest blogger, analytics expert Lana Gibson or ‘Lanalytics,’ is helping the Digital Team at Te Papa to understand our users to help improve our website. One of… Read more »

Conserving and dressing 18th c. Splendour

  • Here we are carrying out the final fitting of both the dress to unsure that the garment is properly supported but not under any stress. At this point we can also adjust the final height of the ensemble and check the silhouette that has been created. Photo by S. Gatley, copyright Te Papa.
  • The near-finished mount, complete with silk petticoat, jersey top cover and sleeve supports. There are strong small magnets attached to the front which will hold the bodice section in position- These are needed as the dress doesn’t have any buttons or other fastening. The opposing magnets will be placed on the outside of the garment. These should be difficult to see as they will be coloured to match the dress.
  • The torso after it has been padded into the correct size and period shape. There is a cotton tube underskirt to hold out the multiple layers of net underskirts instead of legs! Photo by S. Gatley, copyright Te Papa.
  • The mannequin torso with the bust and waist cut away. A cotton cover is attached to the newly shaped form ready for padding to be stitched into place. Photo by Sam Gatey, copyright Te Papa.

A co-authored post by Anne Peranteau, Textile Conservator and Sam Gatley, Costume Mountmaker Historic dress, historic problems In 1951, Te Papa was given three 18th century dresses, all dating to approximately 1780.   Our work in the textile lab is currently focused on preparing two of these gowns for display in the Splendour module of Nga… Read more »

Pukerua Bay School Museum

A sketch (biro on cardboard) by Isaac in a faux rococo frame (hot glue on plastic).

The Pukerua Bay School Museum is one of Aotearoa New Zealand’s newest museums – the brainchild of three Primary school students: Isaac and Paddy (aged 11) and Aurelia (aged 9). Te Papa Learning Innovation has asked the three founders, with the support of their kaiako (teacher) Cat Lunjevich, to write a post for our Te Papa blog all about… Read more »