Posts categorized as Fish

Into the Southern Ocean

A fantastic sunrise at Terror Cove, Auckland Islands. Te Papa

It has been a few days since our last update. During this time, we have been island hopping on the way down to the Auckland Islands. After refuelling and restocking the food cupboards, we departed Bluff on a lovely sunny summer’s day, hoping that the good weather will to stay with us for the next… Read more »

Fish survey off Dunedin: hagfish surprise

A hagfish specimen, Eptatretus cirrhatus, producing large amount of slime when manipulated on the deck.

Day 6:  last stations off the Otago Peninsula sampled. We are ready to move towards the Auckland Islands. We have been blessed with good weather conditions for the last six days which allowed us to complete quickly our diversity survey between 50m and 1200m depth off the Otago Peninsula. We have deployed 50 videos units,… Read more »

Fish team research expedition

Scientists and crew prepare the deployment a fish trap to be sent in the deep canyons off Otago Peninsula

Day 2: sampling off Otago Peninsula. Our survey onboard the MV Tranquil Image has started after a rough transit from Wellington to Dunedin. After a very successful day 1 deploying camera and traps in the shallow (50 and 100 m), today we have started exploring the deep canyons of the area some 25 nautical miles… Read more »

Our Far South

  • Auckland Islands sign and NZ sea lion pup. Photo Anton van Helden. © Te Papa
  • Elephant Seal  Auckland Islands 1995. Photo Anton van Helden .© Te Papa
  • Auckland Islands sign and pup
  • Sandy Bay Enderby Is Auckland Islands 1995

Welcome to Our Far South. This coming Friday I will be standing on the dock at Bluff, looking south, and about to board a boat heading to the sub-Antarctic Islands and the great white continent itself as part of the Our Far South project (www.ourfarsouth.org). What will I see? We all know about Stewart Island… Read more »

Te Papa research online on National Geographic website

Dalatias licha attacking hagfish

Recently, I published with my colleagues from Te Papa Fish Team and Massey University some interesting findings about a fantastic group of species: hagfishes. Those primitive deep-sea fishes repulse any predator attack using their slime. I present examples of how hagfish stop the attack from shark several times their sizes. And it even looked easy…… Read more »

Hagfish versus sharks : 1-0

Hagfish teeth

Not many of you will believe that hagfish, also called snot-eels, are fascinating creatures, but they truly are. You will only be able to believe me after reading this post. I still persist saying that I am not falling in love with them but some of my colleagues start worrying about my desire to always… Read more »