Posts categorized as Fish

Ko te whānau o Matariki: Matariki Education Resource 2015 – Part 3

Orion and the Milky Way by jpstanley, https://www.flickr.com/photos/79297308@N00/16179230263

In Part 1 and Part 2 of this resource, we were introduced to Matariki and her six daughters – learning how each star plays her own special part in preparing the environments of Papatūānuku for the New Year. In this final section, we will be introducing three of Matariki’s cousins: Puanga/Puaka, Pūtātara and Hine-takurua. Papatūānuku has entrusted these whetū kanapa (bright stars)… Read more »

Meet three new species of hagfish

Like something out of a horror movie the common hagfish (Eptatretus cirrhatus) bares its teeth. Photo: Carl Struthers. Copyright Te Papa

A new paper by Te Papa researchers and their colleagues from Massey University, NIWA and the Swedish Museum of Natural History, describes not one but THREE new species of hagfish. This increases the total number species found in New Zealand waters to eight. What are hagfish? These strange creatures, also called snot eels, lack jaws… Read more »

Floor talk about Te Papa’s science

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Would you like to know more about the scientific research carried out by Te Papa? Our natural history research programme encompasses tiny invertebrates to plants, and spans the ocean depths to high-flying birds. For those in Wellington, Science Curator Leon Perrie will give a floor talk in the DeCLASSIFIED! exhibition space on Thursday 2nd April,… Read more »

Last week Te Papa Botany curator Leon Perrie and I attended the Uawa BioBlitz in Tolaga Bay. Organized by the Allan Wilson Centre and Groundtruth, the BioBlitz was an intense 24 hours of species discovery. Scientists from a variety of organisations were joined by members of the local community, including kids from the Tolaga Bay… Read more »

Colossal New Addition to Te Papa’s Scientific Collections

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  • Jar and pail storage at Te Papa's collections facility. Photo: Rick Webber, Copyright Te Papa.
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Today we’ve been hearing about the most recent addition to Te Papa’s scientific collections, a new colossal squid Mesonychoteuthis hamiltoni. We’re playing host to a dozen or so media representatives as well as our own live-streaming film crew, who are following intently the activity of five visiting squid scientists from AUT, led by Dr Kat… Read more »

The sunfish has a name!

School Students and the sharp tail sunfish. Photographer: Scott Ogilvie © Te Papa

As part of Te Papa’s Sunfish Science Extravaganza, a competition was run for school classes to come up with a name for our sharp tail sunfish. We got some very creative and witty suggestions and picking a winner proved a difficult task. After some consultation with fellow educators, a decision was reached… Congratulations to Room… Read more »

Thanks to Radio NZ for featuring our sharp-tail sunfish on Our Changing World.  It’s great to hear the specimen talked about so enthusiastically and knowledgeably. We’re looking forward to bringing you more news on the sunfish specimen once we have the results back from our laboratory and veterinary tests. Check www.blog.tepapa.govt.nz/category/sunfish to find out more about… Read more »

School’s in for sunfish science

On Monday morning 30 students from Brooklyn school huddled around a table in Te Papa’s fish lab. They were here to get a rare glimpse of a very rare fish – a sharp-tail sunfish. While the fish was still hidden under a wet sheet that was part of the defrosting process, scientist Andrew Stewart provided… Read more »

Sunfish: what do we know?

Te Papa and Auckland Museum scientists discuss how to proceed with the sunfish dissection. Photographer: Ruth Hendry © Te Papa

What have we learnt from our day of sunfish science? Sunfish are very hard to sex! The best we can say is that it’s a boy. We think. We’ll have to wait for the test results to determine conclusively whether it’s male or female. Jellyfish are delicious Although we can’t quiz a sunfish on their… Read more »