Posts categorized as Exhibitions

How Many New Zealanders Landed on Gallipoli? The Story Continues

Saying goodbye to mates before leaving Gallipoli. Photo by Norman Prior. Wairarapa Archive

Dr Chris Pugsley, the Historical Director of Gallipoli: The scale of our war provides some background as to why he stood by the use of the original official figures to calculate a 93% casualty rate for the NZEF on Gallipoli: As Historical Director of the Gallipoli: The Scale of our War Exhibition at Te Papa… Read more »

Gallipoli: The scale of our war marked its first anniversary this week, on Monday 18th April. The phenomenal numbers visiting the exhibition have left an enormous number of poppies in the shell crater occupied by Cecil Malthus. Skimming the poppies from this ‘pool’ – to stop them from spilling into the gallery and causing a tidal surge… Read more »

Brothers and sisters: The scale of our war

  • Hospital at the Featherston Military Camp. Photograph taken by Frederick George Radcliffe between circa 1914-1918. National Library, New Zealand 1-2-005955-G,
  • Letter to Leddie Le Gallais returned to Lottie Le Gallais. Tāmaki Paenga Hira Auckland War Memorial Museum (MS 95-11 folder 3)
  • Lottie Le Gallais, about 1913. Photographer unknown. Tāmaki Paenga Hira Auckland War Memorial Museum (PH-95-02)
  • Lottie Le Gallais, about 1913. Photographer unknown. Tāmaki Paenga Hira Auckland War Memorial Museum (PH-95-02)

Through military nursing, a group of more than 500 New Zealand women participated directly in the Great War, including Lottie (Charlotte) Le Gallais, who is our seventh larger-than-life figure in Gallipoli: The scale of our war (above). This blog is about her war and the impact it had on the Le Gallais family. Lottie was on… Read more »

Unforgettable names for a new forget-me-not species

https://www.tepapa.govt.nz/visit/whats-on/exhibitions/you-called-me-what-150-years-scientific-discovery-te-papa

We asked you to suggest a species name for a newly discovered New Zealand forget-me not. In addition to some creative descriptive and geographic names, many of your suggestions were commemorative. The practice of naming species after famous people (real or fictional) dates back over 250 years. Are such names just a gimmick, or an effective means of promoting… Read more »

Indigenous art curatorial practice; ideas and observations

  • Peter Robinson, Retorts and comebacks
  • Gifted 2.
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  • Black Rainbow

I am blogging a paper, as below, written in response to an invitation to talk about Indigenious art curatorial practice for the recent Pacific Art Association XII International Symposium. The symposium was held in Auckland during the week of 14 – 17 March 2016 and in a number of venues across the city including Orakei Marae,… Read more »

Doubling the scale of our war

  • Comparative casulty rate on Gallipoli. Photograph by Kirstie Ross
  • Numbers of NZers landing on Gallipoli. Photograph by Kirstie Ross
  • Sister Lottie Le Gallais. Photograph by Norm Heke
  • Sister Charlotte Le Gallais WWI 22/137 from Archives NZ personnel file

On Monday 21 March, I eagerly read the results of an intensive research project that gives us the clearest indication, to date, of the number of New Zealanders that served on Gallipoli. This research, undertaken by the Ministry for Culture and Heritage and the New Zealand Defence Force, reveals that the total number of New… Read more »

How are we looking? Photo sharing gives us a glimpse into how we look

Mount doom covered in snow. Photograph and Instagram post by txnnxr. All rights reserved

Amos Mann, a Digital Content Producer at Te Papa, finds tensions, connections, and conversations within #tepapaphoto, an Instagram photo sharing project currently underway. We love taking photos. We love sharing photos. And now, more easily than ever before, from across town and across the world, we can instantly show each other where we are, what we’re doing,… Read more »

Sir James Hector and the Kerguelen connection

  • Lyallia kerguelensis, Ile Mayes, Iles Kerguelen. Image: Colin Miskelly, IPEV / Te Papa
  • Hectorella caespitosa, Sealy Range, Southern Alps. Image: Antony Kusabs, Te Papa
  • Commerson's dolphin, Golfe du Morbihan, Iles Kerguelen. Image: Colin Miskelly, IPEV / Te Papa
  • Hector’s dolphin. Image: Steve Dawson, New Zealand Whale and Dolphin Trust

The Kerguelen Islands are among the most remote islands on the planet, lying in the middle of the southern Indian Ocean about 7300 km west of New Zealand (or 17,000 km east if you prefer). Yet they have at least two unlikely connections with New Zealand – a plant and a dolphin. And both are… Read more »

Wineera family portrait : A picture tells a thousand words.

  • Wi Mekerei Rawiri
  • TMP023227~det 3~
  • TMP023227~det 4~
  • TMP023227~det 2~

A PICTURE TELLS A THOUSAND WORDS Stories from He iti whetū : Ngāti Toa portraits. Ngā Toi Arts Te Papa: Kanohi Kitea Māori & Pacific Encounters   This family portrait from the turn of last century is a remarkable and striking statement about family and identity. Titled Ko mātou me ā mātou tamariki, mokopuna hoki, or ‘Ourselves, our children and grandchildren’, this collection… Read more »