Posts categorized as Crustacea

New Zealand has a popular paddle crab (scientific name Ovalipes catharus) found at sandy beaches all round the country and often in fish shops, sometimes alive. I talked about paddle crabs and why they’re important during December’s episode of Science Live, Coastal Creatures.  Paddle crabs or swimming crabs are named for their back pair of legs which… Read more »

Critters of Ohinau Island

  • Close-up of the tusks of a male Mercury Island tusked weta, showing the ridges that are rubbed together to create sound. Image: Colin Miskelly, Te Papa
  • A pair of Mercury Island tusked weta on the forest floor at night, Ohinau Island, January 2014. The large male (with tusks) is on the left; the long appendage at the rear of the female is her ovipositor, used to lay eggs in the soil. Image: Colin Miskelly, Te Papa
  • The entire range of Mercury Island tusked weta. This rare species survived only on 13 ha Middle Island, the small island left of centre in this image. Following eradications of Pacific rats (kiore) on nearby larger islands, they were successfully translocated to Cuvier Island (on the distant horizon), Korapuki Island (immediately below Cuvier Island, and to the lower right of Great Mercury Island), Stanley Island (the large island to the right of Middle Island), the western end of Double Island (which appears as two small islands to the right of Stanley Island), Red Mercury Island (the long, low island on the right), and Ohinau Island (foreground). Image: Colin Miskelly, Te Papa
  • An adult male Mercury Island tusked wets (Motuweta isolata) on the forest floor at night, Ohinau Island, January 2014. Image: Colin Miskelly, Te Papa

Te Papa vertebrate curator Dr Colin Miskelly recently spent 12 days on Ohinau Island (east of Whitianga, Coromandel Peninsula) as part of a Te Papa seabird research team. This blog reports on some of the more impressive invertebrate species that he found on the island. Ohinau is a 43 ha forested island owned by Ngati… Read more »

Is it an animal or an alien?

What is this mystery animal? Drawing by Rick Webber, Curator of Invertebrates © Rick Webber

Sometimes, nature throws up something that’s weirder than you can possibly imagine. Take a look at these pictures – do you know what they are? Clue: They’re both young versions of the same animal. Any ideas? Our Curator of Invertebrates, Rick Webber, will reveal all during Science Live: Coastal Creatures on Wednesday. Watch Science Live:… Read more »

Science Live: Whalebirds – the mystery of the storm riders. Part 6. A bird’s-eye view

Euphausiid Nyctiphanes australis), the favourite prey of Fairy Prions from the Poor Knights and Cook Strait

Here is the sixth instalment in our series of blogs all about prions!  This is in preparation for our upcoming Science Live event on Oct 22nd at 1:50 pm NZ time when you can accompany us into the lab via live streaming  (a permanent link to the YouTube video can be found below).  For more details… Read more »

Science Live: Whalebirds – the mystery of the storm riders. Part 5. Prion foraging ecology

  • Copepod (Eucalanus tonsus), the primary prey of Broad-bill Prions around the Chathams
  • Fairy Prions
  • Barnacles (Lepas australis) are commonly eaten by Fulmar prions from the Chathams
  • Amphipod commonly fed upon by Fairy and Fulmar prions from subantarctic colonie

Here is the fifth instalment in our series of blogs all about prions!  This is in preparation for our upcoming Science Live event on Oct 22nd at 1:50 pm NZ time when you can accompany us into the lab via live streaming  (a permanent link to the YouTube video can be found below).  For more details… Read more »

Critters of the Poor Knights Islands

  • Purple rock crabs (Leptograpsus variegatus) scavenge the corpse of a Buller's shearwater, Aorangi Island, Poor Knights Islands Nature Reserve. Image: Colin Miskelly, Te Papa
  • Turbott’s weevil (Anagotus turbotti) on ngaio, Aorangi Island, Poor Knights Islands Nature Reserve. Image: Colin Miskelly, Te Papa
  • Flax weevil (Anagotus fairburni) feeding on flax/harakeke, Aorangi Island, Poor Knights Islands Nature Reserve. Image: Colin Miskelly, Te Papa
  • Adult clapping cicada (Amphipsalta cingulata), Aorangi Island, Poor Knights Islands Nature Reserve. Image: Colin Miskelly, Te Papa

Te Papa’s curator of terrestrial vertebrates Dr Colin Miskelly recently visited the Poor Knights Islands Nature Reserve, off the Northland coast, as part of a research team tracking the at-sea movements of Buller’s shearwaters. The project is led by Graeme Taylor of the Department of Conservation, and is intended to identify the marine environments used… Read more »

Hoards but not seen

  • A jar of 25 lots of Zeuxoides identified and labelled by Dr. Jürgen Sieg (© Te Papa, Richard Webber)
  • A jar of 25 lots of Zeuxoides identified and labelled by Dr Jurgen Sieg (Te Papa, photographer Richard Webber)
  • Graham Bird (right) and Rick Webber (Curator of Crustacea at Te Papa) collecting tanaids and other small invertebrates from gravel and algae in tide pools on Mana Island during the 2011 Mana Marine Bioblitz. (© Graham Bird).
  • Dr Graham Bird at work in his laboratory, examining tanaids under a microscope (© Graham Bird)

Hoards but not seen – the Tanaidacea Knowledge of a significant but seldom heard of group of crustaceans is getting a fresh boost. In its Crustacea section Te Papa has a good collection of New Zealand tanaids (tar-nay-ids) or ‘tanaidaceans’ (tar-nay-iday-see-ans). Tanaids are little marine crustaceans, mostly 2 – 5 millimetres long fully grown (see… Read more »