Posts categorized as Berry Boys

The Berry Boys – help us identify our unknown soldiers and their families

Last night was a great night for us as Pete Cronshaw of  TV One’s Sunday programme dedicated a full half hour to Te Papa’s ‘Berry Boys’ identification project.  If you missed the programme, or would like to view it again you can watch it here online. As Pete Cronshaw explained, Te Papa’s History Team have been working on identifying the sitters… Read more »

Kiwi Faces of World War I – Anzac Day update. We have reached over 60 identifications!

To mark Anzac Day tomorrow, here is an update on our ‘Kiwi Faces of World War I’ soldier identficiation project. We now identified more than 60 men out of the 110 World War One soldiers who were photographed by the Wellington photography studio Berry & Co. Most of these identifications have been based on detective… Read more »

The Berry Boys – another story from the photos featuring World War 1 soldiers

Medical Report for John Owen Clay. New Zealand Defence Force, Personnel Records. Archives New Zealand.

One of the amazing things about researching the Berry and Co portraits is that with each identification comes new insight into World War 1. The stories behind the people and their experiences make what happened during the war more real and personal. One image in particular pulled at my heart-strings this month, that of John… Read more »

The Berry Boys – photos featuring New Zealand World War One Soldiers

The public interest following last month’s blog post was immense and extremely heart-warming. The reaction was helped along by an article in The Dominion Post on the 5 June entitled ‘Positive search via war negatives’ and an interview with Jim Mora on Radio New Zealand National.  The emails, phone calls and letters poured in. As… Read more »

The Berry Boys – Photos featuring New Zealand World War One Soldiers

Te Papa has a wonderful collection of 172 portraits on glass plate negatives featuring World War One soldiers. These images were taken at the Berry & Co. photography studio in Wellington between about 1914 and 1919. The men in these images were about to enter into a life-changing event. Some would survive, a large number would… Read more »