Posts categorized as Art

Highly sensitive – 19th August 175 years ago

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At 3pm on the 19th August 1839, a joint meeting of the Academie des Sciences and the Academie des Beaux-Arts, heard from the politician and scientist, François Arago, about the details of a process that produced unbelievably fine detail and extraordinarily subtle tonality. Louis Daguerre, who had been working on a light-sensitive process for about… Read more »

Goblins in the gallery

Frank Craig, Goblin market, 1911

We have been busy installing Season 3 of Ngā Toi | Arts Te Papa on Level 5 of Te Papa, which will open to the public on August 23rd. But the exhibitions team haven’t been alone during the installation…there are also goblins in the gallery. Luckily, these mischievous goblins haven’t been running through the galleries… Read more »

New WOW Factor!

A sneaky peak!

This week we are changing over a number of garments in The WOW Factor, an exhibition celebrating the wonderful, creative and inventive World of WearableArt™. The exhibition itself has been extended to 2 November 2014 so that this year’s show attendees can also enjoy seeing a number of garments up close and personal. For those of… Read more »

“Photoised”: Bicycle portraits in the Cook Islands

  • Portrait of a female cyclist, circa 1914, Cook Islands. Crummer, George. Te Papa
  • Rarotongan Coffee Palace , circa 1914, Cook Islands. Crummer, George. Te Papa
  • Family group portrait, circa 1914, Cook Islands. Crummer, George. Te Papa
  • Family group, circa 1910, Cook Islands. Crummer, George. Te Papa

Last year to celebrate Cook Islands Māori Language week, Grace Hutton (Collection Manager Pacific Cultures) wrote a blog about photographer George Robson Crummer who resided in the Cook Islands from 1890. Read Grace’s blog here  http://blog.tepapa.govt.nz/2013/08/07/picturing-the-cook-islands-george-crummer-cook-islands-language-week-2013/ Te Papa has over 240 items from Crummer including 227 black and white negatives some of which are badly… Read more »

Watching goldfish in the nude: Thomas Benjamin Kennington’s Idlesse

T. B. Kennington, Idle Hours (The Goldfish Bowl

Is the painting Idlesse by Thomas Benjamin Kennington (1856–1916) a late Victorian time-bomb, which would have delighted intellectual guru Michel Foucault, author of The History of Sexuality? Or is it an unjustly overlooked, chaste, white masterpiece, a victim of prudery and puritanism in its lack of exposure since its acquisition by the New Zealand Academy… Read more »