Posts written by Heidi Meudt

Tschüss, Deutschland!

  • AG Besprechung Heidi Bernhard Dirk jpg
  • AG Besprechung Niklas Christoph Janina jpg
  • cycling in Oldenburg
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That is the informal way of saying “Goodbye, Germany!” in German. My time as Alexander von Humboldt Research Fellow in Oldenburg has now come to an end, and I wanted to share a few reflections on my experiences in Germany. The last several months of the fellowship were a flurry of activity on all fronts…. Read more »

Going International, Part II – What caught my eye at two recent botany meetings

Heidi Meudt on the botanical field trip to the "Mainzer Sand", at the “Biodiversity and Evolutionary Biology" meeting, the 21st International Symposium of the German Botanical Society (DBG) , Sept. 2012. I am kneeling just behind the European plant species Veronica spicata. Photo by Aaron Liston.

Here are just a few of the many highlights from the two international botany conferences I recently attended: Botany 2012 (Columbus, OH, USA) and  Biodiversity and Evolutionary Biology 2012 (German Botanical Society 21st International Symposium, Mainz, Germany). Plant identification goes visual, interactive and mobile Plant identification keys are useful when you want to identify an… Read more »

Going International

This is a recent photo of me (Heidi Meudt) taken here in Oldenburg. I will sign off in German by saying: Auf wiedersehen, bis bald! Photo by Mauricio Lopez.

Back in July, I attended the 2012 Botany Conference, which was held in Columbus, OH, USA, and later this month, I will attend the “Biodiversity and Evolutionary Biology” meeting of the German Botanical Society (DBG) in Mainz, Germany.  Why so much international travel, you may ask, and why is it important to Te Papa and… Read more »

Highlights from forget-me-not field trips from last summer

  • Here I am collecting Myosotis on a beautiful day on Coronet Peak, Otago, South Island.
  • Myosotis macrantha, near Queenstown, Otago, South Island (WELT SP091596). Photo by Phil Garnock-Jones.
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This year I went on several field trips to collect native forget-me-nots (genus Myosotis). With my research on native plantains now finished, my current research focus is now to figure out how many native species of forget-me-nots we have in New Zealand, revise their taxonomy, understand their evolutionary history, and amend their conservation status. Te… Read more »

A new native plantain, Plantago udicola

  • Botanical illustration of Plantago udicola. Copyright Bobbi Angell.
  • Habitat of Plantago udicola from Lake Sylvester (WELT SP090374/A). Photo copyright Mei Lin Tay.
  • The new species, Plantago udicola from Lake Sylvester (WELT SP090375/A). Photo copyright Mei Lin Tay.
  • The new species, Plantago udicola from Lake Sylvester (WELT SP090375/A). Photo copyright Mei Lin Tay.

Victoria University Emeritus Professor Phil Garnock-Jones and I have just described a new species of native plantain, Plantago udicola. The name udicola means “dwelling or living in damp places” and is in reference to the types of sites the new species is usually found in. Of the 200 or so species of Plantago worldwide, there… Read more »

Te Papa botanists attend recent systematic botany conference

  • Otira Valley, Arthur's Pass National Park, ASBS 2010 field trip, Dec 2010. Photo by Heidi Meudt, © Te Papa.
  • Andrew Clarke (Otago University) and Heidi Meudt presenting a wiki workshop at the ASBS 2010 conference. Photo by Carlos Lehnebach, © Te Papa.
  • Otira Valley, Arthur's Pass National Park, ASBS 2010 field trip. Photo by Heidi Meudt, © Te Papa.
  • Carlos Lehnebach giving his talk on Uncinia at the ASBS 2010 conference. Photo by Heidi Meudt, © Te Papa.

Botanists from Te Papa recently attended and presented some of their research at the 2010 Australian Systematic Botany Society (ASBS) Conference. Notably, this is only the second time the annual ASBS Conference has been held in New Zealand. The theme of this year’s meeting was, “Systematic botany across the ditch: links between Australia and New… Read more »