Art Say – have your say on art at Te Papa

Paratene Matchitt, The family, 1966. Te Papa (2009-0002-1/A-C to C-C)

Paratene Matchitt, The family, 1966. Te Papa (2009-0002-1/A-C to C-C)

With the spring season of Ngā Toi | Arts Te Papa opening tomorrow, we’re giving you the chance to have your say on art – in English or Māori.

You can write about any art work in the galleries on Level 5 – in 100 words or less. We’ll publish a selection of the most compelling submissions in the gallery and here on our Art Say blog. Whether you’ve just learned to read and write, or are a seasoned critic or wordsmith, we’d love to hear what you have to say.

You may know something about an art work that we don’t. It might inspire ideas, memories, or even a poem. Or perhaps you’re completely bamboozled and want to ask a question. You might even be outraged by what you read or see, and think you could do better. This is your opportunity.

How to have your say

In the exhibition
On Level 5, go to Whare Toi | Arts Studio and pick up a ‘My say’ form. Browse the galleries for inspiration, have your say, and then pop it in the ‘My say’ postbox.

Online
If the muse doesn’t strike while you’re here, you can email your say to artsay@tepapa.govt.nz

Please include the following.

  • Name of art work
  • Name of artist
  • Your name
  • Where you’re from
  • Your age (optional)
  • What you do (optional)

If you can’t visit the galleries, feel free to browse the works online:
arts.tepapa.govt.nz – Te Papa’s online home of the arts

Fill in a form in the Ngā Toi gallery or email artsay@tepapa.govt.nz to have your Art Say

Fill in a form in the Ngā Toi gallery or email artsay@tepapa.govt.nz to have your Art Say

More on Art Say

Art Say is part of the Sounding Board in the Arts Studio, a place for sharing ideas about art. The theme for this season is Collect, Conserve, Communicate – a museum’s core activities.

And that’s where Art Say comes in. What drives us to collect and care for art and other objects? How do we communicate ideas about art? How does art communicate its own ideas? How does it affect our perspectives and conversation?

The following two takes on Colin McCahon’s religious paintings show how radically different responses to art can be. They’re from the same year.

‘Have they some profound revelation to us? I can only say that I suspect not. They might pass as graffiti on the walls of some celestial lavatory … but that is all.’ (A R D Fairburn, Landfall, 1948)

‘The art of Colin McCahon has a fire and originality which sets it apart from that of most New Zealand painters.’ (James K Baxter, Canta, 1948)

Colin McCahon, The valley of dry bones, 1947. Te Papa (1983-0049-1)

Colin McCahon, The valley of dry bones, 1947. Te Papa (1983-0049-1)

Join the conversation

To contribute to the conversation on any art work in our galleries, whether it moves or mystifies you, delights or dismays, visit Ngā Toi | Arts Te Papa on Level 5. This season features five entirely new exhibitions, and new works in other galleries too.

Go to arts.tepapa.govt.nz for more about what’s on

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