Giving matters – David Carson-Parker (1932-2012)

Te Poho o Rawiri, Kaiti, Gisborne, 29.06.1962, Gisborne. David Carson-Parker. Gift of David Carson-Parker, 1997. © Te Papa.

Te Poho o Rawiri, Kaiti, Gisborne, 29.06.1962, Gisborne. David Carson-Parker. Gift of David Carson-Parker, 1997. © Te Papa.

One of the most generous ways museums acquire items for their collections is from individuals donating things they have made for the benefit of others. This is one way that unique material becomes available to the public and especially to researchers. It is in this spirit that David Carson-Parker, who died 21 October, donated many decorative art and photographic items to Te Papa. However it is the donation of photographs taken by David himself that makes up the largest share of his legacy to the museum.

During the 1960s David travelled around the North Island of New Zealand taking photographs on 35mm colour slide film of numerous meeting houses. Described by David as a ‘personal project’ – I assume he meant self funded – he used Carved Maori Houses of Western and Northern Areas of New Zealand (1955) by William J. Phillips, as a guide book to identify where to go. Now these images provide a valuable record of how these wharenui (meeting houses) looked prior to restoration.

Whitikaupeka, Moawhango, 05.12.1962, North Island. David Carson-Parker. Gift of David Carson-Parker, 1997. © Te Papa.

Whitikaupeka, Moawhango, 05.12.1962, North Island. David Carson-Parker. Gift of David Carson-Parker, 1997. © Te Papa.

Through his involvement in the New Zealand Potters Association, David also took photographs documenting the visit of British potter Michael Cardew to Wellington in early 1968. Cardew was an important influence on New Zealand potters such as Peter Stichbury. During Cardew’s visit he demonstrated his method of work to local potters and David’s black and white photographs still enable us to see something of the potter at work – physically stretching, kneading and shaping clay.

Untitled [Michael Cardew stretching clay], 1968, Wellington. David Carson-Parker. Gift of David Carson-Parker, 1997. © Te Papa.

Untitled [Michael Cardew stretching clay], 1968, Wellington. David Carson-Parker. Gift of David Carson-Parker, 1997. © Te Papa.

Untitled [Michael Cardew kneading a ball of clay], 1968, Wellington. David Carson-Parker. Gift of David Carson-Parker, 1997. © Te Papa.

Untitled [Michael Cardew kneading a ball of clay], 1968, Wellington. David Carson-Parker. Gift of David Carson-Parker, 1997. © Te Papa.

Untitled [Michael Cardew finishing the base of a bowl], 1968, Wellington. David Carson-Parker. Gift of David Carson-Parker, 1997. © Te Papa.

Untitled [Michael Cardew finishing the base of a bowl], 1968, Wellington. David Carson-Parker. Gift of David Carson-Parker, 1997. © Te Papa.

 

Sometimes David’s donations were quite personal. One of my favourite items David gave to Te Papa is a beautiful spoon made in Dunedin by Frank Hyams and gifted to David’s grandmother, by her husband, on the birth of David’s mother Elizabeth, in 1903.
 Spoon, 1899, Dunedin. Frank Hyams. Gift of David Carson-Parker, 1995. Te Papa

David took on many roles that directly supported the creative sector, including a stint as President of the Friends of Te Papa. On behalf of staff at Te Papa I extend our sympathy and condolences to David’s partner and family.

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One Response

  1. Robert Catto

    How fascinating! I knew David for the last ten years or so and (as a photographer myself) he talked often about Brian Brake and how they knew each other years ago, but never mentioned his own photography. Though, somehow, that’s David for you – I’ve been thinking today about how many things around Wellington he was involved in quite heavily, and how few of them bear his name in any prominent fashion.

    I photographed David a number of times over the past decade or so, at events around town (and inevitably stopped for a good long natter while I was there), and have put together a gallery at
    http://catto.photoshelter.com/gallery/David-Carson-Parker/G0000W_opbxWBU2s
    for anyone who’s interested in remembering him further.

    All the best, and thanks for posting this about him,
    R

    Reply

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