Getting the Williams from groundfloor to the fourth

When making exhibitions here at Te Papa, teams have to install a wide variety of objects. You, the visitor, generally only get to see the polished final product – everything all beautifully laid out, ready for viewing.

Have you ever wondered how we get the big stuff in? All I can say is – thank goodness for the goods lift. Now, I know it’s big and has had cars in it in the past but you never fully appreciate this ability until you see it for yourself…

The Williams FW14B going into the goods lift.  © Te Papa, 2009.

The Williams FW14B going into the goods lift from the ground-level dockway. © Te Papa, 2009.

And so the Formula One cars were moved, one by one, from the dockway up to Level Four.

Various objects get moved to their respective gallery’s usually by trolley – but with the installation of these Formula One cars it was a different kettle of fish…. a different road to follow you could say :)

Those responsible for the safety of the cars decided on wheeling them through Level Four from the lift…

The Williams coming out of the goods lift on level four. © Te Papa, 2009.

The Williams coming out of the goods lift on level four. © Te Papa, 2009.

These cars are designed to operate beautifully at very high speeds – which meant  turning corners at very slow speeds very tricky. There was no such thing as a perfectly executed 3-point turn! More like five or six-point shimmying to get them around corners and into the Visa Platinum Gallery… there was a lot of maths…

Wheeling sedately past the Britten bike. © Te Papa, 2009.

Wheeling sedately past the Britten bike. © Te Papa, 2009.

Backing the Williams into the gallery. © Te Papa, 2009.

Backing the Williams into the gallery. © Te Papa, 2009.

You may have noticed that we backed it all the way – this is so it ended up facing the right way on its plinth inside the gallery – told you maths was involved :)

Putting the nosecone back onto the Williams FW14B. © Te Papa, 2009.

Putting the nosecone back onto the Williams FW14B. © Te Papa, 2009.

You may also be thinking that the Williams FW14B is not looking that flash – it’s nose-cone had been removed in England so it didn’t get damaged in transit. So we’ve made Nigel Mansell’s 1992 car look gorgeous again… rhinoplasty does wonders!

The Williams on its final resting place in the Visa Platinum Gallery. © Te Papa, 2009.

The Williams on its final resting place in the Visa Platinum Gallery. © Te Papa, 2009.

One Response

  1. emmab

    Do you think you have what it takes to drive an F1 car?
    Wanna win the chance to actually drive an F1 Williams?
    check this out and entre the competition:
    http://www.attwilliams.philips.com/

    Reply

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